DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Recently moved in to a 1952 home that has had modest updates. Windows are all newer and vinyl - probably 20 years old or less.

My wife and I are expecting this coming summer so I'm going through the home doing some safety tests, and today we had the XRF lead test. Unfortunately, lead paint is pervasive throughout the home, namely in all window trims and sills (not actual windows), all door frames and jams, all doors themselves, fireplace surround and mantle, all crown molding, and some wainscoting. All of the lead paint is very likely underneath the current top coat of white paint.

You can imagine the immediate and nearly overwhelming anxiety that rushed over after the inspector broke the news. I was frankly shocked that the window surround materials were contaminated given that the windows are newer and that they would have left it there.

Much of the paint is in decent condition on the windows, trims, moldings, and baseboards. There is some chipping, some nicks etc. Some of the paint on the doors and jams is flaky just given their friction and not being quite square anymore.

Obviously complete removal by a remediation specialist, then installation of new material would be ideal, however that isn't financially viable at the moment, given that we just bought the home and are planning for a child.

Attached are three examples of typical chipping that I am seeing. They are typically in this size range. No areas that I have found yet have prolific chipping or peeling, most of the concern areas look like the below.

Questions

1)
If the paint is in good condition and not flaking or chipping, and not subject to any consistent friction, is there any need to abate in the near term? From my initial reading, there shouldn't be any health concerns in this areas. This would include most trims, baseboard, moldings, wainscoting etc

2) If these pieces do get a chip, or a flake, or a nick (as seen in photos), is it safe simply to repaint it so long as the rest of the material is satisfactory?

3) Should I repaint all of these items just to ensure they’re covered?

4) Do I need to use a specific encapsulator or is high quality trim paint ok?

5) Knowing that the door jams and doors themselves are friction areas, that will probably get our attention first. Given that these pieces would likely be removed in whole pieces, and not cut or sanded, can their removal be DIY? Or should I opt for a contractor?

Appreciate everyone's thoughts, or any additional thoughts, opinions, guidance. Trying to prepare for a first child and being told there’s a lot of lead paint around is not easy.
643297

643298

643299
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,112 Posts
Spot prime and repaint. Keep it encapsulated under newer coats. if you want to fill old chips and gouges, prime it first, then you can spackle, and carefully sand the spackle, making sure not to burn through old paint. its not a hard thing to do, if you are aware.

Also, lead dust is heavy, so a big danger is pulling up old carpet, as thats where any lead dust has settled. Other than that, you dont need to worry about anything unless you need to make repairs. If a chip comes off the trim, pick it up, throw it away, and wash your hands. Then touch up where it came from.

The main danger is burning or sanding. Just dont sand anything past the first layer or two of paint. Its 2021, so any lead has likely been painted over several times. Thats not a gaurantee, but reasonably likely. if you ever need to replace trim, bag off the area, get a hepa filter, put on a tyvek suit and respirator, cut the caulking, and pull it off, vacuum everything with a hepa bag.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
375 Posts
You as a home owner can do pretty much anything in your home, Legally only a contractor with a RRP license can remove the old trim and install new. Anything that has chips needs to be addressed, painted over easiest. Lay plastic down on the flloor while working in an area , if wood floor wipe down with cleaner until rages are clean. Just be minedful of the situation and yo will be ok. Also when you bought the house it should of been dsiclosed to you that there maybe lead paint given the age.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks all. Have had two experts come out and take a look - both recommended very mild action on the paint, wet sponge, prime, paint.

For the doors they both understood it could be more of a hazard. Recommendations were to either remove the doors (hinges are painted, presumably contaminated) and take them outside to plane them, then install new hinges and go from there. Also recommended as an option was just to remove doors, junk them, and install new doors. They thought the cost would be about equal between the two options.

Front door, rear door, and a french door we have are a little more complicated. Similar options, but also said they could be dipped.

Not really sure how to proceed but at least now I know what is likely necessary.
 

·
In a little over my head
Joined
·
1,214 Posts
Unless you sand it off, that lead paint isn't going to jump off and get you. Paint over it with good quality paint. In a couple of years, teach your kid not to eat paint chips.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
fair but it could very well be rubbing, causing friction and, thereby, dust. no?

Friction surfaces at doors and windows will create dust. Lead in dust is as hazardous as paint chips. As the OP's experts said, doors are more complicated than other surfaces.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,273 Posts
If you are so afraid of the dust from surfaces rubbing, it is facile to remove the doors, clearance them, and repaint. You can even do this outside. You can also paint over the jamb once the door is clearanced.
 

·
retired painter
Joined
·
10,691 Posts
Lead based paint hasn't been used residentially in about 45 yrs. While it might be possible for the paint to get ground down from operating the door - the odds are minimal that the lead paint would be affected because of all the non lead paint applied over it. The lead paint chipping is a greater risk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,584 Posts
Lead is only dangerous when ingested or inhaled. As was mentioned even lead dust is heavy and settles quickly, so the main thing to avoid is anyone getting it into their mouth, either directly, or by transfer from fingers.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top