DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When we moved into our house I laid some laminate in three rooms. Two years on, I'd like to finally lay the skirting board, but holding it against the wall I've noticed that the wall isn't completely flat, leaving a gap of 0.5cm in some places.

How should I resolve this? Do I need to make the wall flat? I can I use a filler of some sort to hide the gap? Is there another trick?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Definitely masonry.

* When I say definitely, I mean that when I've drilled into them, I've never had the impression there's wood in there. The walls that connect to the ajoining houses are VERY tough (not getting through without a hammer drill). The other walls are softer. I once went through one of these walls with the drill after applying a bit too much pressure.
 

·
Retired Cabinetmaker
Joined
·
189 Posts
Where do you live............the UK?
Americans aren't accustomed to the term "skirting board" and "0.5cm".
Older UK house interior walls were mostly 3x2's with lath and plaster, some could be soft brick.
After the 60's they were breeze block or cinder block.
Houses in the 80's could be partition walls using a honeycomb center.
The gap you say is 0.05cm or a gnats noodle over 3/16"
I would take a little out of the plaster or sheet rock at the high spots and shim and caulk the low spots. This way as you look at the baseboard...........sorry........skirting board, it will appear straight to the eye and you will not notice the unevenness against the laminate floors.

Woody [a transplant from the UK]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
714 Posts
Well spotted, Woody. I thought that, too, because of the terms used, and that's why I asked if his wall was masonry (most US walls being timber- sorry- lumber).
Aside from that, I don't see what he could do with the skirting other than on the lines you suggested.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm an Englishman living in The Netherlands, but as far as I can tell it's not far off what I've experienced in the UK. That said, I'm a very trustworthy source on the matter :)

The walls do have a plaster layer on top, which has been applied with a stucco effect (not sure if that's the correct term - in Dutch it's called "structuur").

Nice suggestion to fill in the gaps. I suppose I could do that with the "structuur". What do you think? Still the best option?
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top