DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,264 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm laying down two layers of 3/4" subfloors for my bathroom remodel. First plywood, then advantech (moisture resistant). On top of that will be laying down 1/4" cement board and then tile.

My stud to stud measurements are 99.5" x 109.5". So I'll have to work with smaller pieces near the edges. I also plan to lay the advantech perpendicularly to the plywood in the areas where the most weight will be. So the first and second layers seams are not on top of one another

Here's the layout followed by the plywood and advantech layouts.

1. Is using small pieces near the edges ok or should I cut down the 4x8 sheets?

2. Is laying down the flooring perpendicularly the right way to do it?

Thanks










Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
JUSTA MEMBER
Joined
·
15,252 Posts
ut the first layer to always meet at the center of the joists, or install blocking to support it.
Never leave any piece hanging unsupported, even close to a wall.
Then the second layer perpendicular is fine. And the way that I would do it.

ED
 

·
JUSTA MEMBER
Joined
·
15,252 Posts
Yes you can.

You will have irregular pieces, but for proper support each and every edge needs a joist, or blocking piece under it at least once to prevent sagging squeaking or failure.

Start in the center of the room and work to the walls, and use blocking along the walls between joists to support the floor

ED
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,264 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I put blocking along the edges and where the two big boards meet. Is that adequate? Do I still need to cut irregular pieces? Would prefer the avoid that.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
JUSTA MEMBER
Joined
·
15,252 Posts
Do not know.

Have no idea where your joists lie in the room, nor how they intersect the walls.

If you have normal 48" X 96" flooring, there might be a way to cut just two halves, but I doubt it.

You need to experiment to see how many ways the sheets can be cut.

Use a scale model on graph paper, not real wood until you figure it out.


ED
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top