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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am finishing my laundry room and would like to surround the machines with cabinets for the built-in look. The cabinets will come down to within an inch of the top of the machines.

If I install the shutoffs below the cabinets and behind the machines, the only way to access them will be to pull the machines out. To make them more easily accessible I could install them above the machines inside the cabinets.

Where should I install the shutoffs?

Thanks, all.
 

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Framing Contractor
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The idea of a shutoff is to stop the flow of water quickly and easily. In an emergency, I would hate to have to wiggle out the machine with water flailing. If you do put them in the cabinet, push them towards the rear.
 

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Are you referring to the shut-offs for the washing machine hoses? You would want those easily accessible, not hidden, so they can be turned off preferably after every laundry session. This is even recommended by the machine and the hose manufacturers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
My initial plan was to install the shutoff in a laundry outlet box in the rear wall, then add a cutout in the cabinet when I install.

My concern was more if it was a code violation or not a best practice to install inside of a cabinet.
 

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My initial plan was to install the shutoff in a laundry outlet box in the rear wall, then add a cutout in the cabinet when I install.

My concern was more if it was a code violation or not a best practice to install inside of a cabinet.
Like six, I can't comment on code. But I will say probably not best practice. The cupboard WILL become full of cleaning and laundry products, still blocking the shut-offs. Although not as bad as behind the machine.
 

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Where's the washing machine drain pipe?
More reasons for not behind the machine.....how would you move it if it was full of water, do the installation directions call for the hose connections to be a certain height above the top of the machine?
If in a cabinet how would you run the water supply hoses into the cabinet?
Why not have the bottom of the cabinet higher up or build the cabinet around the hoses and water supply leaving them exposed on the wall?
 

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Why not have the bottom of the cabinet higher up or build the cabinet around the hoses and water supply leaving them exposed on the wall?

He wants the "built in" look.


It comes with a price of extreme inconvenience when something goes wrong.


You can conceal the stop valves inside a cabinet, but like someone suggested it could be cluttered with stuff you need to get out of the way in a hurry.


You also have to deal with a lot of hassle with hookup. How will you hook up the drain hose to the piping? Do you need to pull the machine out just to see if it's may have slipped off the pipe? How do you make sure the drain hose is secured to the pump at the base of the machine? Or the dryer vent duct hook up? All of that is made A LOT harder to put in, examine, and repair.


On top of that, people are accustomed to putting stuff on top of the machines, now you can't because the cabinets are there, and to get to use the cabinet you have to open those doors, so most likely those doors will be permanently opened, so the shelf space can be accessed all the time, which defeats the built in look.


Finally, this completely eliminates the possibility of top load washers if there is no room to open a top lid. You never know what the appliance trends are today is top loading, 10 years ago was top loading, it may go back to top loading one day. Or side loading LOL.
 

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If you want to build the cabinets right down to the top of the washer, put the shutoff valves near the bottom of the cab, with an access hole through the back of the cabinet. Then install your lowest shelf about six or eight inches above the bottom. Install a easily removable panel (maybe on magnets?) at the very front of this compartment to ensure nothing blocks access to the valves. To shut off the valves, open the door, pull the panel, shut the valve. You'd also have to drill holes in the bottom of the cabinet for the hoses.

Maybe a better idea: Build your cabinet's lowest point about a foot or so above the shut-off box. Then install doors that extend a foot below the cabinet. Closed, you get the look you want. Open, access to the valves and replacing hoses is much easier.
 

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Red Seal Electrician
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My shutoffs are conveniently placed in the backsplash area of the laundry tub; which is right next to the machines (stacked). My plumbing is all exposed behind the machines and under the tub. (Planned it that way - its a utility room.)

I am considering a dividing wall (well, 3/4" veneer plywood upright) and I'll just carve out a pocket near the back for the hoses to pass through.
 
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