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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a bathroom vanity that is 15 years old and covered in melamine. We are remodeling the bathroom and the wife no longer wants the white vanity. We have opted for red oak. I have made doors for the vanity, and would like to laminate over the box which is in excellent condition. I plan on using the lamination sold a Home Depot or Lowes. Will the laminate stick to the melamine if I scratch with sandpaper? The laminate is preglued, and can be applied with a hot iron, or can use contact cement type adhesive, which would be best? I have never attempted this before, and would appreciate any thoughts or advice.
 

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I have a bathroom vanity that is 15 years old and covered in melamine. We are remodeling the bathroom and the wife no longer wants the white vanity. We have opted for red oak. I have made doors for the vanity, and would like to laminate over the box which is in excellent condition. I plan on using the lamination sold a Home Depot or Lowes. Will the laminate stick to the melamine if I scratch with sandpaper? The laminate is preglued, and can be applied with a hot iron, or can use contact cement type adhesive, which would be best? I have never attempted this before, and would appreciate any thoughts or advice.
Well that is new to me, I haven't seen the iron on except for end caps. I can't say if it will stay or not but regular HPL with the regular contact will stick if the melamine is roughed up. I haven't installed HPL over melamine but all it is is thin HPL. If you do iron it on just beware that heat can make HPL blister and curl.
 

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Are you using plastic laminate or real wood veneer? Veneer edging is iron on, but I would use solvent glue for the frame face etc. I would take 40 grit paper and go over all glue surface. For bath vanity, water getting into the joints would be a problem. I would use contact cement, cut the pieces wide, roll the joint real good and finish with a router. 2 coats of glue. First is kind of primer, thin and pressed on. Let dry to tacky and roll on second coat. Iron on laminate or veneer wouldn't give you the tight joint. Glue gets too hot then cools too fast while the joint is not tight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I was wondering if I should use a real wood veneer with the contact cement, or would it be easier to use quater inch oak plywood and use wood glue to attach it to faceframe. I have never veneered before, and the vanity is built in, therefore I will be gluing on a vertical surface. From what I have seen, no room for error when using contact cement.
 

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I know you said it's built in .You would be way ahead of the game ,especially if you have no experience with laminate or veneer,to take the existing face frame off and replace with one out of solid 3/4" oak.How much can it cost for wood to build a face frame.It will be cheaper than veneer,laminate ,glue and save you a lot of headache.
 
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