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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Does anyone have any experience or have heard anything good/bad in regards to a foundation waterproofing additive: Krystol Internal Membrane (KIM) made by Kryton?

Here's their website for more info:
http://www.kryton.com/products/krystol-internal-membrane-kim/

We're building a new house, in the design phase now, and want to make the foundation as water tight as possible. Local concrete supplier quoted $65.50/yard extra for this additive (110 yards total), which equals about $7205 extra for the additive.

3 foundation companies we got estimates from don't have experience using concrete with the additive, but they're all willing to use it if we want. Talking to a rep from Kryton, he said that the process is no different than using typical concrete. The only local foundation contractor who has experience using the additive concrete never returned my multiple calls.

We appreciate any info you can provide us, thanks in advance!


EDIT: Found this regarding waterproof additives in concrete:
http://www.waterproofmag.com/back_issues/201004/integral.php

The article claims:"Kryton’s Krystol Internal Membrane (KIM) has been used around the world for more than thirty years."
 

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Concrete & Masonry
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That's an incredible amount of money IMPO. I've only heard of the stuff, but never used it.

I think I'd spend 1/2 of that and go with a decent asphaltic coating and a proven drainage plain on the outside. I'd be concerned that the potential for shrinkage cracks exceeding the admixtures limit could occur, or in other words, there could be a crack wider than the admix could "swell" shut.

I'd also consider using a larger draintile (I suggest Form-a-Drain) and as much stone backfill on the exterior as you can afford. The best way to stop a leak from occuring in a basement is to create a substantial weak point for the water to travel to........
 

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That's an incredible amount of money IMPO. I've only heard of the stuff, but never used it.

I think I'd spend 1/2 of that and go with a decent asphaltic coating and a proven drainage plain on the outside. I'd be concerned that the potential for shrinkage cracks exceeding the admixtures limit could occur, or in other words, there could be a crack wider than the admix could "swell" shut.

I'd also consider using a larger draintile (I suggest Form-a-Drain) and as much stone backfill on the exterior as you can afford. The best way to stop a leak from occuring in a basement is to create a substantial weak point for the water to travel to........
Ayuh,..... No truer words ever spoken,....

Head off the water, Before the wall,....
Not at it, 'n not after it,....
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the info, we appreciate it.

So to create a path for the water to travel away, you mean putting in curtain drainage, correct?

What other things should we have the contractors do to ensure no water problems in the future? We'd rather go overboard and over-do it rather than just do the minimum.
 

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keyton's great stuff - we often used it in the city on pours,,, however, for MY house, we'd put the extra $ into a decent below-grade waterproofing system instead :thumbsup: for the info, we appreciate it.

only 1 comment - asphaltics aren't elastomeric - we use sonneborn's hlm5000 ( or equal from meadows ) in retro work which is then covered by o'lapped sheets of 19mm pondliner :thumbsup:

along w/collected wtr evacuation system, you'd be dry as a bone :thumbup:
 

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& there are plenty of other good suppliers of that hdpe cast fabric - miradrain's another - meadows, basf, & on,,, even down here, some of our apron/vest stores carry it,,, we buy it as needed from a specialty conc supply house,,, works ok but its easier/faster ( cheaper ) to hang pondliner :yes: :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for everyone's advice. We've decided to not use the KIM additive, as the concrete contractors have never used it and it's a slightly different procedure while pouring.

Instead, we're going with standard 4,000psi concrete with crushed stone fill on the 2 high sides of the foundation with standard footing and perimeter draining to daylight.

2 more questions:

1) We're deciding on which exterior waterproofing to go with, any review or opinions on either?:
- Tremco Tuff-N-Dri system with panels for protection
- Rubber Polymer Corporation Rub-R-Wall with panels for protection

2) Besides foam panels, is there any other additional protection we can use for the waterproofing barrier?

Thanks!
 

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tuf-n-dri does not accept foam panels. It needs what's called a drainage barrier or dimple membrane. At least that is what I have found researching it. It is what I am having put on my walls. Apparently the tuff-n-dri will eat the foam.
 

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both systems are good altho i'd bet tuff/dri's less expensive than rub-r-wall,,, we've done both & never used foam panels,,, std protection course is dimplebiard,,, don't forget the toe drain & proper drainage
 

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