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Discussion Starter #1
I have six kitchen receptacles on a 20 amp circuit. Two of them above the sink. I checked the panel and it is a standard breaker. The circuit feeds only the receptacles in the kitchen. I have found no gfi protection for those six receptacles What I want to do is pull all the receptacles and replace them all. The first one with a gfi, as to protect all up stream. Or do I buy standard receptacles and replace the breaker with a fault interrupter. The house was built in 1977 in Cleveland Ohio. I am looking for the best most up to code way of doing this project. Cost is not a factor.
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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Identify the first receptacle and replace with GFCI and connect the rest to the load side.

Or

Install a GFCI breaker.

Either one is fully compliant.
 

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Licensed Electrician
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Technically, those receptacles behind the sink should be blanked off so they cannot be used.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
Is there any reason to replace all receptacles with gfi s? I would also like to clarify the location of the receptacles behind the sink. They sit just on the very outside edge of the sink and are @ 8 inches above the counter top.
 

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Licensed Electrician
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I don't know when the code was put in place. Personally, I don't THINK it was ever legal to put a receptacle directly behind a sink, but I have nothing to back me up. If the receptacles are outside the edge of the sink, they are fine.
 

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I don't know if they were still using al. back then, but make sure to have a copper/al. rated device if you do.
 

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I have never seen a gfi rated for aluminum.
 

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Only need one gfi per circut as long as it's the first one in the circut.
In coming power goes to the line side, out going goes to the load side.
 

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Electrical Contractor
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GFCI protection for kitchen counter receptacles was not required until the 1987 edition of the NEC.

So, any house built or wired before that time did not require such protection.

As others have pointed out, you can provide GFCI protection in many ways, by installing a breaker at the panel, or a GFCI device at the first outlet in the circuit.

Or, a stand-alone GFCI receptacle in place of each outlet. If your circuit includes an outlet for a refrigerator, then I'd recommend this method, leaving the fridge outlet without GFCI protection.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
My original thought was that the fridge was feed by the kitchen receptacles, I was surprised to see the fridge on a dedicated circuit. Same with the microwave. The receptacles are worn out, I pulled one of them to just take a peek and it was back stabbed. The electrician I worked with would pull, cut and strip, then bend the wire and put it on the screw of the receptacle. In what seemed like one fluid movement. I have plenty of slack, should I cut and strip or wrestle getting the wires out of the back?
 
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