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Where as the plug is used for a fridge, I'm suspecting its possibly a split circuit receptical and perhaps when he was testing the power he didn't pay particular attention to which side of the receptical he was testing each time - Although he may have thrown the breaker for the top, the bottom still had juice or vice versa...
 

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Discussion Starter #23
I found the main house panel and it was not in the garage, but outside in the utility box. This is good to know. I did shut off the power here and all the power did go off in the house.

The problem now is that the power in the kitchen circuit will stay on when I shut off the circuit breaker panel that is in the house. This is very strange that only the kitchen circuit stays on, and the rest of the house power is off.

well....I have an licensed electrician coming this week and hopefully all will be resolved soon :no:.

thank you everyone for your helpful tips. I'll let you know what happens.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
:thumbup: I have power now! The electrician who has about 30 years experience found this interesting and anxious to get to the bottom of it. At the panel, the circuit that's for the range (220) was attached with a bracket along with 2 (110) which was for the kitchen outlets (it was not labeled as such, bc it was labeled "Utility" "Range") He couldn't understand why it was done this way. I told him it's been like this since I brought the house 21 years ago. So all these years the outlets were wired along with the range and never labeled properly. He disassembled the bracket and now the switch to turn off the kitchen outlets are independent and not a part of the range (220) circuit.

Now I can turn off the correct circuit and it will shut off the right plugs.:thumbsup:

I still don't completely understand, but he said that was the cause of it staying on.
 

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apt238 said:
I had a kitchen outlet that was working, but faulty (top receptacle of outlet didn't always have power). I changed to new receptable, now the entire circuit in kitchen doesn't work. If you can advise of what I can do, I would like to know what happened. I used a plug tester, but nothing lights up.

Did the range work when this problem first started?

It is lucky that you did not get electrified by changing the outlet that was on a different breaker then indicated on the box.

I was going to suggest that before the electrician came to the house that you turn off one breaker at a time and check each outlet to see which outlet corresponds with what breaker.

Sometimes outlets on diffeent floors and different rooms are on a breaker that is not indicate on the simple labels on the panel box.


:thumbup:
 

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apt238 said:
He couldn't understand why it was done this way. I told him it's been like this since I brought the house 21 years ago. So all these years the outlets were wired along with the range and never labeled properly. He disassembled the bracket and now the switch to turn off the kitchen outlets are independent and not a part of the range (220) circuit.

Now I can turn off the correct circuit and it will shut off the right plugs.:thumbsup:

I still don't completely understand, but he said that was the cause of it staying on.
The range needs a higher output then just the plugs.
It is the same for an electric dryer. It requires two breakers (usually 30 amps).

The reason that it was wired this way was because someone took a short cut.

You must have had the range on and other appliances on at the same time in order for the breaker to turn off.

Did he put the new breaker on a 15 amp or a 20 amp breaker?
 

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They're all fixer-uppers
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A word of advice for the future - take nothing for granted w/ electricity. ESPECIALLY messing around w/ 220v. But even with 110v - hell, I'm even careful around a 16volt doorbell because it builds good habbits. ALWAYS test wires youi are about to work with using a neon tester or some other kind. It takes two seconds and might mean the difference between taking a good 220 across the heart or not... Even when the panel is labled, don't take for granted its right. I had to change a GFCI in my kitchen a week after I bought my house. The panel had a label that actually said GFCI receptacles in kitchen. It was wrong, I tested before changing the receptacle, the correct circuit was one down the panel...
 
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