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Discussion Starter #1
hello, I am wondering if anyone has any ideas about two level kitchens.

my current kitchen is a gallery style and the original porch (now an enclosed laundry room)and outside laundry room are on the other side of the wall. once the wall is knocked down, these rooms are a step down from the kitchen.

We are planning to knock down the wall to expand kitchen about 6 feet. however, you will have to step up or step down within the kitchen.

it would take too much to raise the roof where we are expanding and if we build the floor up then it will feel like the ceiling is too short on one side fo the kitchen.

does anyone have any ideas on how to make a kitchen on two levels work and look attractive??

figured I would ask here before my brain is fried. thanks...:(
 

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If you don't mind the split then it works
Might be a tough sell tho if you move
I would only have one area to step down into the other area
Maybe between a countertop & wall ?
 

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Define the two spaces by function so that it isn't a kitchen on two levels but say, a kitchen and pantry, or kitchen and home office, kitchen and banquette, etc.
 

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If it's an "eat in" kitchen, then I would try to arrange the dining area to be on the lower level. It's going to be obnoxious stepping up and down as you work around the space doing normal kitchen chores. and be careful knocking out the wall in between . Sure sounds like it could be a bearing wall.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thinking it through...

thanks for the replies everyone! I believe defining the two spaces will work for me and still make the space attractive if I sell.

I am working with someone who re-did his own kitchen and he says the wall that is coming down is not a bearing wall?. we will frame the open space with a support beam.

I think keeping the work space (sink, stove, fridge) in the original space will be best since the ceiling is higher and putting the pantry, laundry closet, etc on the lower level will work.

any other suggestions are appreciated!!

brain feeling less like frying...:huh:
 

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I am working with someone who re-did his own kitchen and he says the wall that is coming down is not a bearing wall?. we will frame the open space with a support beam.
DANGER Will Robinson! Unless he is an engineer or a licensed contractor I would get a second opinion before you start day dreaming your new kitchen.
 

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If there is any roof that ends on this wall then it is load bearing
If there are joists (ceiling or rafter) that end on this wall then it is load bearing
How long is the wall?
Is this a gable end?
The fact that it steps down to access the outer room seems to indicate that this was an outside wall at one point
 

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To expand the kitchen area you could shift the cabinets out into the porch area so the face of the cabinets is essentially even with where the wall was. The ceiling height difference can be hidden by an over cabinet soffit. On the opposite side you will need to frame in a new floor for the cabinets and could even build in drawers facing that room that are under the cabinets facing the kitchen.

If this wall was an exterior wall there is a darn good possibility it's load bearing. Don't cut anything out until you are absolutely sure you know how much load you're dealing with and what kind of beam/supports you need to safely open the wall.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
the WALL...

thanks again for the feedback. the enclosed laundry room used to be the porch so I know that can be opened again.

I will check on the wall where the outside laundry room is. that may be an issue. :huh:

a retired contractor is helping me with this project, but it's a good idea to run this stuff by him for up to date procedures. he did just re-do his own kitchen thought...

thanks again!
 

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better pull a permit also and in order to get the permit for this structural change you will need a structural engineer to analyze the project and he will prepare a report stipulating loads and structural element requirements. This is the only way to do this and is also the safest way in case anything should happen down the road. If the room settles you go back to the structural engineer, if the wall collapses you go back to the structural engineer. If someone gets crushed you go back to the structural engineer without one you go back to your bank account!

Good luck and be safe!

James
 
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