DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Please help! Just had the the kitchen of an older (1989) house that I bought demo'd and took up the old flooring. The electrician & plumber dug a fairly large trench across my kitchen slab to move the electric and plumbing to my future island. Is there anything that I can have the trench filled with that will dry and process faster so that I won't have to wait a month plus to lay my new engineered wood flooring? I am in a catch 22 situation- the kitchen installer wants to wait for the floors to be done and the floor installers say ordinary concrete could take a month or more . I won't say money is no object but I am willing to spend the bigger bucks if there is a product that will help get the job done much quicker. Thank you!
 

·
Master General ReEngineer
Joined
·
9,772 Posts
and the floor installers say ordinary concrete could take a month or more .
Ayuh,.... Never heard of such a thing,.... What sorta floorin' is goin' in,..??

Concrete takes a month to fully cure,...
But,...
You can walk on it/ build on it the next day, maybe 2,....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Engineered wood flooring; they are telling me that too much moisture in the concrete will eventually mess with the flooring and I think he said adhesive! If so this is such a set back! (Thank you for your response by the way)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,070 Posts
If you use a high early cement mix, it will cure in between 24 and 72 hours, and will reach between 2500 and 3000 lbs, in 8 to 10 hours depending on the temperature, but you MUST USE HIGH EARLY CEMENT, not a fast set mix, and just to be sure i would use a vapor barrier under that engineered flooring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thank you Canarywood. I'm not very swift with all this. Not sure if that means it releases it's moisture faster? Moisture rather than strength is the floor mans concern.
 

·
Remodel and New Build GC
Joined
·
9,461 Posts
Are you doing your kitchen install (cabs/appliances) OVER your eng'd flooring.

How about just doing your install on the slab.... and waiting 28 days for a glue down floor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,070 Posts
Thank you Canarywood. I'm not very swift with all this. Not sure if that means it releases it's moisture faster? Moisture rather than strength is the floor mans concern.
The different types of cement do make a difference in setting and curing times. Portland Type 3, is a High Early, or rapid set cement. It is ground more finely to allow hydration to occur more quickly, and the speed at which concrete hydrates does have an impact on early curing, i understand your problem with curing, and it's why i suggested a high early mix, it's the fastest cure you can get for your job, your call though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thank you Yes we are putting kitchen cabinets/appliances over top-just something about knowing whats under there or incase we want to move something etc in the future.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
The different types of cement do make a difference in setting and curing times. Portland Type 3, is a High Early, or rapid set cement. It is ground more finely to allow hydration to occur more quickly, and the speed at which concrete hydrates does have an impact on early curing, i understand your problem with curing, and it's why i suggested a high early mix, it's the fastest cure you can get for your job, your call though.
Canarywood, thank you for the explanation and so far it sounds like the best idea- the plumber mentioned using hydraulic cement. Would that be considered similar, the same, better, worse? I tried googling it but it didn't help me much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,070 Posts
Canarywood, thank you for the explanation and so far it sounds like the best idea- the plumber mentioned using hydraulic cement. Would that be considered similar, the same, better, worse? I tried googling it but it didn't help me much.
Hydraulic cement is not the right product for what you want to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Hydraulic cement is not the right product for what you want to do.
Thank you I was hoping after what you said then what he said & after he sent this that we had it solved because they sounded like one in the same...
Type III, High-Early-Strength, Portland Cement
1. Product Description
Basic Use: Lehigh ASTM Type III (AASHTO TYPE III), low alkali, Portland cement is a special purpose hydraulic cement that produces higher early strengths relative to a normal Type I-II Portland cement. Type III Portland cement is formulated to be used in grouts, mortars and concrete
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,070 Posts
Hydraulic Cement is a product used to stop water and leaks in concrete and masonry structures. It is a type of cement, similar to mortar, that sets extremely fast and hardens after it has been mixed with water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,058 Posts
Follow the instructions of the flooring contractor / Manufacture. About 1/2 the water used to mix the cement will evaporate the other 1/2 will be trapped in the pores of the slab.
Have the flooring contractor use a moisture meter to check the moisture content of the slab. Ask the contractor if the PH of the concrete will have any affect on the adhesive being used?
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top