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Hi AAron, and welcome to the forum,
Any math can be a challenge if you have been away from it for awhile, but most of it gets simplified once you get into the field. In school they want you to know why things are the way they are, but in the real world you will reference charts and tables. But the math still helps.

Regardless of where you find help, with todays internet you can be sure someone will have the answer. As for your math issues, what math is giving you difficulty? Do you have an example?

I tutored my BIL to help him get his "A" shop electricians license in NJ and I held a limited electricians for low voltage, same code book, retired now. But I find many posters on the DIY forums to be very knowledgeable.

If we can help, we will.

Bud
 

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Electrical and electronics are all based on math.Figure it out or maybe find another field that your more interested in before you get to far along.If you fight the math now it will fight you forever. V = volts W = watts R = resistance Why the hell is current in amps = I
Go figure.Good luck with it.
 

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It is vital that you get your head around the four main aspects of electricity, that is -
Volts,Amps,Watts and resistance, but this is simple maths.
The other stuff is rarely used in the field.
But important for full understanding, which is required only occassionally
when you get that stinker of a job that you have to reason out.


:vs_cool:
 

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There is almost no math in any residential wiring, although there are occasionally some basic arithmetic problems that may seem intimidating at first if you're not a math guy (e.g. a load calculation, etc...). But when you're working with something that can kill you or burn down a million-dollar-home, it's VERY reassuring to understand enough of the theory behind it to understand how you are avoiding death and liability.
 

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There is almost no math in any residential wiring, although there are occasionally some basic arithmetic problems that may seem intimidating at first if you're not a math guy (e.g. a load calculation, etc...).
Unfortunately, there are some situations that require the use of math that some very experienced electricians forget about. Doing voltage drop calculations for long runs to outbuildings etc. it's something that's very critical in many cases and becoming even more so these days because of all the electronics people put in them.
 

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Unfortunately, there are some situations that require the use of math that some very experienced electricians forget about. Doing voltage drop calculations for long runs to outbuildings etc. it's something that's very critical in many cases and becoming even more so these days because of all the electronics people put in them.
Absolutely, the math you do is very important (e.g. voltage drop for long runs, sizing a breaker correctly for heaters, etc...), you just don't have to do it for most wiring.
 

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Absolutely, the math you do is very important (e.g. voltage drop for long runs, sizing a breaker correctly for heaters, etc...), you just don't have to do it for most wiring.
In my experience 95% of electricians seldom to never use the math they study so hard to learn during their apprenticeship.

Asked most electricians 2 years out of their apprenticeship and see what they remember about the math they learned in year one. Most can't give you the primary and secondary amps of a single phase transformer much less a three phase transformer.

I guess the good news is there is an online calculator or APP for almost every math need electricians face


Not saying they should not be taught the math as I think it is important for an understanding of our profession.
 

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Problem is , math is very important . But math used by the typical electrician in the field , is not very complicated .

This is the stuff you should have learned in high school . Problem is , many guys spent more time studying girls , sports , video games ( or drugs ) .

I never had any problem with the math , I learned it in school .

But if you ever intend to advance beyond bending conduit and pulling wire , it gets more important .

Another thing is computer skills . Very important . And I do not mean playing with your smart phone .

Remember , you need skills that make your boss money . If he does not make money , he can not pay you .

I came from an electrical back ground . My Dad was an electrician & I worked with him . But when I started apprentice school , the code book threw me off . Much of it is / was written in lawyer language or engineer language .

Terminology was different than that used on the job . for example , a neutral in the code book was the grounded conductor .

For years , I have advised new apprentices , in school , to sit down and start reading the code boot , cover to cover & maybe in 6 months or so , it will begin to make some sense .

This is not easy or simple . Nor is it intended to be . This is serious as a heart beat . This is life safety . That is why you have to earn a license .

If you can step up to that , Welcome to the trade . If not , maybe you need to consider another trade .

God bless
Wyr
 

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Electrical and electronics are all based on math.Figure it out or maybe find another field that your more interested in before you get to far along.If you fight the math now it will fight you forever. V = volts W = watts R = resistance Why the hell is current in amps = I
Go figure.Good luck with it.
I was taught that Voltage = E, Current = I, as in E = I x R, I = E / R, R = E / I
and Power (Watts) = I x E.

E being the abbreviation for "Electromotive Force" or Volts
 

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I taught electrical and electronic Associate degree programs for 7 years.

my suggestions - show up ready to learn, stay focused on the lesson, if you do not understand a principle, ask for help (the instructor is not a mind reader), ask questions that will help you understand, don't be afraid to ask what this will be used for?, do all that you can to apply yourself to learning, remove distractions (no cell phones)

the math will include algebra and some trigonometry. some schools offer a refresher math course to help students that may be struggling with the math.
 

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I completed a five year apprenticeship, and to echo the post above, there's a lot of algebra and a little bit of trig.

Knowing (and hopefully understanding) all of the necessary formulas is critical.

We had to solve for all parts of an AC circuit (Xl, Xc, Z, PF,...) and understand current flow through an AC circuit (leading, lagging, in phase).

Is this a 4 or 5 year apprenticeship program? IMO, you will have much better job training and employment prospects going thru that type of schooling, vs getting a 6 month or year long 'certification' that really won't advance your career.

Best of luck in school :)
 

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Some really good posts here about the subject and I have a degree in electronics not electrical for residential.I agree that the knowledge you learn in school as far as the math may not be of much use day to day but the theory of any trade you learn will be invaluable at making you better at your trade.
It will make you stand out from the rest and may come in handy some days.
 
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