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I have a 1 1/2 story home built in the 1800's. Some idiot installed one of the jacks upside down and its missing parts. The floor above the messed up jack has about 1-2 inch gap between the floor and baseboard.

Need to buy at least a couple of new ones, but I'm not sure what size I should be buying. I've never had to mess with floor jacks before so any advice would be greatly appreciated.


How far apart should I have the jacks? trying to figure out about how many I should be buying to get the house all nice and releveled.
 

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retired framer
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I have a 1 1/2 story home built in the 1800's. Some idiot installed one of the jacks upside down and its missing parts. The floor above the messed up jack has about 1-2 inch gap between the floor and baseboard.

Need to buy at least a couple of new ones, but I'm not sure what size I should be buying. I've never had to mess with floor jacks before so any advice would be greatly appreciated.


How far apart should I have the jacks? trying to figure out about how many I should be buying to get the house all nice and releveled.
Can you post some pictures of the structure you are looking at.
 

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I have a couple of 50 ton hydraulic jacks I used for lifting when I had to level some floors in this house. I picked them up for a farm supply store of all places. But remember, you are not lifting the entire house at once. Only a very small portion. I've some lift a section with a 4 ton hydraulic jack. That is a little too small for my preference. I would rather have a jack that I know with lift without struggling.
 

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If you are referring to the jack post, then you get the height figured out, and purchase one that is slightly shorter than the max span. Jack posts are adjustable with pins and a screw top, or bottom. There really is no top or bottom on a jack post.
 

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Ayuh,...... I've jacked alota buildings, a 12 ton hyd. jack is what I use most of the time,....

It's gonna take some Time for that crack to go away,......
House leveling is usually a long S l o w process,.....

I replaced the foundation on one side of this house,....
When I set the house back down on the new level foundation, it took 5 years for the 5" hump in the middle to settle down onto the foundation,.....

At the other side of things,.....
Back in 2000 I jacked our 24'x 24' lodge up 2', slipped in a steel foundation, 'n set it back down, in one day, with only 2 helpers, 1 of which wasn't much help,....
We did it with 8, 3 ton wagon jacks,......
Needless to say, it was pretty spooky crawlin' under it that way,.....
 

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That looks like the top of the block foundation. Like there are no joists spanning over top of it. What does it look like from the basement. That is what we needed to see in the pictures. Not the house itself. Need something that we can see a reference against.


I put a couple steel I beams under this house. I do not want it to ever have issues again. The cause of this was human error. They cut out the two support posts that were in the basement at the mid-point of of the span of the 12x12 beams that went from the front to the back of the house. They removed them to put in a furnace way back in the 20's or 30's. And of course, things will begin to sag because gravity next takes a day off.
 

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retired framer
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I would use a 20 ton hydraulic jack and a 4x4 right beside that. Lift it 1/8" a day until it is just a little high and then put plywood square on top the old one and set it down.
 

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You can visit any welding shop to pick up some quarter or half inch plates about 6 inches square, or even rectangle. There is a plate under that jack already. But if you disturb it, you will want to replace the footing under the jack post. I would replace it with a new one so that you can have the adjustable screw at the top where it is easier to adjust.
Like others have stated, take it slow and be patient. You cannot raise the structure much each week/month. Maybe 2 - 3 millimeters each time.
 

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retired framer
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You can visit any welding shop to pick up some quarter or half inch plates about 6 inches square, or even rectangle. There is a plate under that jack already. But if you disturb it, you will want to replace the footing under the jack post. I would replace it with a new one so that you can have the adjustable screw at the top where it is easier to adjust.
Like others have stated, take it slow and be patient. You cannot raise the structure much each week/month. Maybe 2 - 3 millimeters each time.
If that post is on a footing that sank, there may be a void under the floor, I would be afraid of putting the load on the slab there.

I should have mentioned about spreading the load under the hydraulic jack too.
 

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Don't know your complete circumstances but I'd be jacking up that beam on both left a right side, remove the "bad" jack/post and cut out at least a 24"x24"x8" section of the floor slab - with CARE for any buried utilities! - pour a concrete footing pad, use hi pressure concrete, and reinstall a new jack post once the concrete has cured (week to 10 days). With a new post in place then you can begin to lift the beam, say a half rotation of the lever/day. Yeah I know, time. But time will serve you well here.
 
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