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Is this product manufactured and distributed with parts that are compliant with NEC code?

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yes it's me again. After correcting the wiring issue I had with my outdoor lighting I was trying to finish up a little side project that I have going on with the electric lamp post in my yard. The old fixture was toast and it kept burning through bulbs and water was getting in there. so I went to home Depot and bought this Hampton Bay lantern head made by Cordelia lighting.

645001


And with all the homework I've been doing lately with rewiring my house for my kitchen I have learned a little bit about aluminum wiring and I'm really surprised that this product here is sold with aluminum wiring that is 18 AWG so I don't even know what the equivalent copper wiring would be to that like 22 awg? Lol anyways whatever it is it's not any wiring that I know of but let's just say of course I'd run 14 AWG to it because that's what's going to the fixture from the panel right now. The nuts that they give are clearly not the ones suited for tying aluminum together with copper. So this product is giving you materials in it that are not to NEC code. And is at the very least a corrosion hazard if not a fire hazard and yet no mention of the wires being aluminum or the dangers of aluminum wiring or any of those sort of specifications are mentioned on the box or in the instruction manual.

So I guess I'm just kind of curious how everybody else feels about this or if I'm overreacting. and if not, I'm wondering if a bunch of us call into Cordelia lighting or home Depot they're sold through and complain about this maybe we can actually get them to change their product and make it actually safe and good quality. At the very least I guess just letting people know that I think this does pose some issues so that they're a little bit more aware of what they're buying and what they're hooking up when they install stuff like this.
 

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The wire size is tested by the manufacture and can be less than the size you would feed to the fixture. The reason is the lamp holder can not take a bulb rated more than the wire.
Yes it is tinned copper. Don't know why fixtures use tinned wire, someone else will know.

Cowboy
 
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No only does wire gauge matter, the temperature rating of its insulation matters.
 

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Tinned copper 18 gauge is fine for a single socket. Wire has to be rated at least 105 C, and all fixture wires are rated at least that.
If you want to confirm the construction of the wire, it will have printed or embossed into the insulation the wire type. You can Google that wire type to see what it is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The wire size is tested by the manufacture and can be less than the size you would feed to the fixture. The reason is the lamp holder can not take a bulb rated more than the wire.
Yes it is tinned copper. Don't know why fixtures use tinned wire, someone else will know.

Cowboy
Thank you
 

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And with all the homework I've been doing lately with rewiring my house for my kitchen I have learned a little bit about aluminum wiring and I'm really surprised that this product here is sold with aluminum wiring that is 18 AWG so I don't even know what the equivalent copper wiring would be to that like 22 awg?
20 AWG.

Your next stop is to search the box and product for a UL Listing, CSA, ETL, or other NRTL. If UL approved it, they know more than you.

There is a sea of crud coming from direct mail (sadly, including Amazon) which has no such listing, either has a faked CE or a faked CCC. They usually do not fake NRTL listings. I absolutely would expect to see aluminum wire on those.

I'm not exactly clear on how the regulations bear on businesses (except Amazon seems completely immune to accountability). But bricks-and-mortar stores (who are actual chains and not flea market/Chinatown junk shops) are very reliable about selling UL-approved equipment.

They still sell lots of things they should not sell, like NEMA 10 receptacles, non-TR receptacles (they are the HOME depot) and Feit Electric... but this one is legit.


Lol anyways whatever it is it's not any wiring that I know of but let's just say of course I'd run 14 AWG to it because that's what's going to the fixture from the panel right now.
You are required to do that! NEC 240.4(D).

The lamp is required to meet the UL White Book standards, which do allow #18 zinc-tinned copper for internal-to-fixture wiring. Tear down any fluorescent fixture (say: to convert it to LED) and you will find a lot of #18 TFFN wire.


And it is UL listed.
I suspect your lack of experience is giving you more of a problem than the fixture.
Lack of experience is only a problem if you don't know you have it.

Actually, there's an academic paper "Unskilled and unaware of it" which is vaguely related.
 
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