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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I am trying to install a ceiling fan. I took down the old light fixture that was there. My issue is that the electrical boxes is not flush with the ceiling, it is a little less that a 1/4 inch showing. If I try to install the ceiling fan it will be uneven. The Electrical boxes is directly under a ceiling joist. I am not sure how to solve this issue.

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Will a shorter box support the weight of the Fan? Do the boxes at the hardware store give weight requirements?

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The depth of the box has no bearing on the weight capacity. The problem you may have is how the box is supported in the ceiling. Some junction boxes were only made to support a standard light fixture when they were installed. Since a ceiling fan is much heavier, make sure the mounting screws are long enough (and there is more than one) to support the weight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you... I found a thin metal box that will support up to 70lbs. I just have to take the old one out and replace it with the new one.
 

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Ceiling fans require a special box. You should not use a light fixture box with a fan. The box does not necessarily need to be flush with the ceiling. Most fans have a canopy that has a range of projections it allows.
Ron
 

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Ron, I have installed numerous ceiling fans and always used the box that was originally installed after checking the installation. I have never heard of a "ceiling fan junction box". I always made sure the box was metal and not plastic though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If I connect the mounting bracket to the current box in the ceiling the canopy will not sit flush with the ceiling. There will either be a gap from the canopy to the ceiling around the whole thing or part of it, leaving it uneven.
 

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the lighter weight of most home fans is easily held by the steel boxes.
however, the larger models i've put in do require some reinforcements and sturdy construction. but they are also made to NOT be mounted to a box, but rather a (usually round, free-swinging) bracket.
in your case, you could always try to find a 'beauty ring' that could make up the difference?

DM
 

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Ron, I have installed numerous ceiling fans and always used the box that was originally installed after checking the installation. I have never heard of a "ceiling fan junction box". I always made sure the box was metal and not plastic though.
You might want to do a little research about this. it's been in the electric code for a few years. With the rise of their popularity years ago people were just hanging them with those little screws that you would use to attach the hanger bar to the box. Over time, vibration would loosen the screws and the fans would drop off the ceilings. The new boxes have a "U" bolt that wraps around the top on the box and the fan is attached by bolts with a nylon sleeve so they don't loosen. They have ones for new construction as well as retrofit boxes that fit into the 4" hole and attach by way of telescoping shafts, with prongs, into the joists.
A google will bring you up to date about this.
It's your house, do what you want. All I'm doing is informing you how it should be done, correctly.
Ron
 

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It used to be that fans over 35# need a specially mounted box.

I'd make a round escutcheon plate out of two sheets of 1/8" masonite glued together and slightly larger than the fan mounting cup ceiling footprint and cut a hole in the middle slightly larger than the box footprint.

Nobody will notice. I did this for a bathroom wall-mounted light.

Wood slowly chars at 120C and PVC junction boxes melt at 75C to 110C and you've got an air gap between the masonite and the box so your wooden plate is actually safer than your plastic box.
Try to tell that to the NFPA or UL.
 

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Ron, I have installed numerous ceiling fans and always used the box that was originally installed after checking the installation. I have never heard of a "ceiling fan junction box". I always made sure the box was metal and not plastic though.
Although I may not always agree with Ron's particular method of achieving the same ends I would attain, I have learned to listen to his usually very correct advice.
Read THIS.
 

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There are boxes designed especially for ceiling fans, where the 8-32 machine screws (not to be confused with 8/32") thread through the base of the box in addition to the supporting bracket! for additional weight support and vibration control of the ceiling fan. Those boxes are definitely recommended wherever possible. Obviously not in this case where the original poster has a problem with a standard ceiling box and is seeking a space solution! (with a "donut")!
 

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This installer is "old-fashioned" and sticks to metal boxes, especially where heat-producing lights and heavy ceiling fans are concerned! We've seen (nationwide) plenty of those nice plastic junction-boxes melt down when something goes awry with the installation!
 

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Ron's right

The issue isn't metal or plastic, but rated and not. There are and have been specific boxes made and rated for ceiling fans. No matter what it is attached to you don't want to hang your heavy and expensive ceiling fan over your head or your kids from just any old box. I've seen octagon boxes screwed through the back to a ceiling joist actually separate at their folded or spot welded corner seams. If Sweets box is protruding and he isn't positive of it's durability, then what he needs is called a "pancake" box designed for a ceiling fan-it'll cost six bucks instead of 1.78 but you can hand a Hunter or Casablanca on it and not worry about finding the fan on the dining room table or in the middle of the bed. The expanding brace models Ron described also work quite well when the center of the ceiling falls between joists in an existing or old work situation. All of this stuff is available for less than 20 bucks at HD or Lowes ceiling fan departments not in the junction box aisle. good luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I purchased a box designed for ceiling fans. It supports up to 70lbs. I reinforced the joist in my attic just in case. I mounted the fan and got everything connected. It works perfectly. I just want to thank everyone for their advice.
 

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Thanks for taking a few minutes to respond with your results. I am sure all the guys that took a few minutes to help you appreciate it to.

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