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Discussion Starter #1
Hi-
Going from finsished maple to antique white w/ glazing. I did this 4 years ago but can not exactly remember how I did it. All paints are water based. Looking for some input.

scrub down
sand with Orbital 180
clean/ 409
roll primer
lightly sand 220 by hand
spray primer
lightly sand 220 by hand
spray solid color
lightly sand 220 by hand
spray antique white
lightly sand 220 by hand
spray antique white
apply glazing
spray solid vinyl sealer
spray 2 coats of clear satin
 

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Rubbin walls since'79
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Sorta-
Are you removing doors?
You roll primer- do you back brush or just leave the stipple?
Why 2 coats primer?
You say spray- Do you know how?
Usually one primer 2 top coats can get it.
What is the difference between vinyl sealer and clear coat?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I do not know how to spray. I do one coat of primer myself because I never think enough primer gets on the cabinets when it is sprayed on. Its been my understanding that too much primer is a better problem than not enough.

My tenant is a painter and he will come and spray the cabinets.

I was hoping to find if there was a difference between vinyl sealer and clear coat.
 

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No this is one situation that the two coats of primer will do well. Maple has alot of tannins that will want to soak through and make your white into a light yellow.
 

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Ahhh. yes there are woods with more tannins. However not many so dark. How clever of you to point that out.

If you would pay attention to the original poster. (for the last time) He mentioned ALL products are water based. With that knowledge alone I figured they would do better with the extra coat of primer. Especially if it were to be sprayed on too thin. Remember guys were supposed to be here to help.

Is any of this making sense?
 

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paper hanger and painter
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Ahhh. yes there are woods with more tannins. However not many so dark. How clever of you to point that out.

If you would pay attention to the original poster. (for the last time) He mentioned ALL products are water based. With that knowledge alone I figured they would do better with the extra coat of primer. Especially if it were to be sprayed on too thin. Remember guys were supposed to be here to help.

Is any of this making sense?[/QUOTE]


not to me:no: there are woods with more tannins , like oak, maple is not one of them
 

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I must be lucky I have never had tannins in maple bleed thru any primer. To the OP if you feel better with 2 coats then go for it, it won't hurt anything.
 

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I do not know how to spray. I do one coat of primer myself because I never think enough primer gets on the cabinets when it is sprayed on. Its been my understanding that too much primer is a better problem than not enough.

My tenant is a painter and he will come and spray the cabinets.

I was hoping to find if there was a difference between vinyl sealer and clear coat.
Did anybody answer the question in red?
 

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I do not know how to spray. I do one coat of primer myself because I never think enough primer gets on the cabinets when it is sprayed on. Its been my understanding that too much primer is a better problem than not enough.

My tenant is a painter and he will come and spray the cabinets.

I was hoping to find if there was a difference between vinyl sealer and clear coat.
Hiya Sac...

Grant brought up the point that no one ever answered your q about vinyl sealer - you mentioned that you're using all water borne primers and finish - does this apply to the vinyl sealer and clear coat too?

Typically clear vinyl sealers are for use beneath hot solvent topcoats (not water-borne), such as solvent lacquers, some epoxies etc. They are sometimes used as "sandwich" type primers to protect a solvent sensitive coating from a hot solvent finish coat. If that's the case, it doesn't sound like your finish is a water-borne clear. If it is a water-borne clear, are you talking about a water-borne poly? ...or a water-borne lacquer (CAB lacquer)? In either case, a vinyl sealer wouldn't necessarily hurt anything, but is not water-borne, and is way over-kill for what you're trying to finish.

Now, to further confuse the issue - water-borne polys typically don't call for any type of sealer as there can be compatibility issues with those components that make a sealer a sealer...Plus, most (not all) wb polys are not really an easy product to spray - they can be, but the recommended method is usually brush app.

And if you're considering the CAB lacquer (water-borne), CAB's are not always the best recommendation for kitchen cabinets as they are not typically very resistant to oils and grease, and can soften from detergent cleanings (and in the method you've described, they really wouldn't need a sealer anyway).

Let us know what the clear vinyl sealer and clear coat actually is that you're considering - but with the information we currently have, I think I'd recommend the water-borne poly with no sealer, and brush applied as opposed to spray.
 

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Anyway, could someone explain how to do the "scrub down" step? I have to paint my wooden cabinets too. I also want to clean my latex walls before repainting them. I don't know the best product to use.
 

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Anyway, could someone explain how to do the "scrub down" step? I have to paint my wooden cabinets too. I also want to clean my latex walls before repainting them. I don't know the best product to use.
I accidentally found "Liquid TSP Substitute...cleans surfaces in preparation for painting." Before painting over semigloss latex, I'm thinking I should clean with this stuff, sand, clean again with this stuff. I heard tack cloths have oil so I guess it's better to wipe the sanding dust off with a damp rag or this stuff. I wonder how many professional painters would bother.
 

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Liquid TSP cleaners, Dirtex, Krud Kutter (maybe the same) are possibles. Be sure whatever you use you follow the directions as to rinsing, important, especially if it contains phospates.

Two washings seems overkill to me. Fortunately, I've never done a cabinet job so dirty that I had to wash first to prevent my paper from gumming up. Except that is in rental units where, mysteriously, that grease helps paint bond better. :laughing: Real TSP etches surfaces as well as cleans, if you're a good rinser.

I would sand the cabinets, then wash.
 
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