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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

Does this ridge looks bad (the red line is mine, that is what i would expect a straight ridge to look like)? We are planning on replacing a roof, and some people say it's not a problem for this ridge and nothing needs to be done. Others are saying this needs to be resolved. What are your thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Not yet, it just looks like that from the street (comparing my house to neighboring houses). I assume I need a pretty long level to see the sag?
 

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No you run a string tight from one end to another & then raise/lower one end to get the string level
Then you can tell how far off it is

My last house I put a new roof/ridge beam up over the front rooms
It was about 9" sag over maybe 12'

 

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No you run a string tight from one end to another & then raise/lower one end to get the string level
Then you can tell how far off it is

My last house I put a new roof/ridge beam up over the front rooms
It was about 9" sag over maybe 12'


That little device attached to the masonry string line, is called a "Line Level" and comes in very handy.

From a visual appearance, unless you know of, or discover some major structural issues, the sag is typical of older homes, especially if they have had significant weight placed on the roof, such as in multiple layers of shingles or extreme snow weight.

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ed,

The house was originally built in 1932 (but so was the entire neighborhood). It currently has 2-levels of shingles. Are you saying that "sag" itself does not constitute a structural defect? And thus, if nothing else is structurally wrong, it does not need to be corrected?
 

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Without seeing and inspecting the property, that would be impossible for me to verify and authenicate for a fact.

But, from past experiences, many, many homes that I have worked on have a natural settlling to some areas, which create this dip.

It would be prudent to check out all of the rafters and how they are attached to the wall plates and also to see if the rafters need to be tied for additional structural stability so as not flex downward any further in the future.

Ed
 
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