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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This black filter drier's direction arrow points down towards the furnace & a-coil. Yet it is hooked onto the warm uninsulated line... doesn't the refridgerant on that warm line travel away from the furnace to the outside condenser? Is this wrong but not something to worry about, right, or is it something to be concerned? My AC is working decently - just wanting to lean & understand.

thanks!
 

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The direction is ok. :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you both for the responses and the diagram is very helpful! I looked the graphic for a minute but it still seems counterintuitive to me. I'm sure you're both right - I just need to think on it more!
 

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thats the liquid line dryer feeding the evaporator coil and after the air passes over the fins the freon changes state and pressure into a suction gas back to the compressor..the liquid line comes off the bottom of the condenser into the house:whistling2: that expansion valve takes the liquid and meters it into the evap sextion like a garden hose does to water and with the pressure drop in the spray you get your refrigeration effect and 40F coil.the heat from the space is absorbed into the suction gas and travels back on that insulated line to the compressor to start the cycle again should always be cold on that insulated pipe and on the short pipe just into the furnace
 

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Its not only installed with the arrow pointing the right way, its also installed in the correct location.
 

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Its not only installed with the arrow pointing the right way, its also installed in the correct location.

I have seen filter driers being installed close by TXV valve at Evap coil and after/before the service valve ( Liquid Line ). Which one installation is more eficently?
 

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If the evap is in a basement or other area that doesn't get too warm, that is where it belongs.

Installed at the service valve, it can release moisture when it becomes to hot.
 

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I'll be the devils advocate. It gets hot inside the condensor where they are installed from the factory so heat is not a huge deal IMO. We install all of ours within a foot of the condensor with no problems. However if you are in Texas with 110 deg sun beatin down on it that can't be good or if it is on a hot black rooftop.:no:.

Max no difference to me and in the ole days who wanted to weld in the basement if they did not have too? Flare fittings and quick connectors were used on most coils. Nowadays there is welding to be done so I see them inside.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It is installed in the basement of a home in Illinois by prior owners who themselves did poorly at things they DIY but seemed to hire quality contractors. (or spend good money for things they contracted).

The discussion has really helped - I get it now as much as I need to for having good insight as a homeowner.
 

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I'll be the devils advocate. It gets hot inside the condensor where they are installed from the factory so heat is not a huge deal IMO. We install all of ours within a foot of the condensor with no problems. However if you are in Texas with 110 deg sun beatin down on it that can't be good or if it is on a hot black rooftop.:no:.

Max no difference to me and in the ole days who wanted to weld in the basement if they did not have too? Flare fittings and quick connectors were used on most coils. Nowadays there is welding to be done so I see them inside.
Do you remember most manufacturers went to sending the LLFD separately for the installers to install when R410A first came out. That was so that it could be installed inside, or in the cooler location of the install to prevent the release of moisture from it getting too hot. unfortunately, they also discovered that some installers were not installing the LLFD then and were using it on other service calls later. So they went back to installing it inside the cabinet again, since a FD there is still better then n one at all.


FD's are rated to hold X amount of moisture at different temps. That is why location can matter in some areas, specially the areas that get above 50 in the summer Yuri. :laughing:
 

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years ago didn't they wrap the suction and liquid together in the runout for some changing of the freons temps going each way...or was that i refrigeration applications only...anybody
Some mini splits did that, and I think one or 2 still do. Might have been one brand of A/C that did that. Sort of recall seeing it a couple times.
 

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In this area, the only liquid lines on black roofs are on commercial, and few of them have an y real problems. attics can be worse.
 

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FD's are rated to hold X amount of moisture at different temps. That is why location can matter in some areas, specially the areas that get above 50 in the summer Yuri. :laughing:
50? Heck when that happens everyone lays down for a Siesta except for the Polar bear, he goes swimmin:laughing:
 

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