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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is this a good multi-meter for do-it-yourself automotive and home electrical testing.....Klein model# MM400?
I have little experience with multi -meters. So I am a beginner.
 

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The auto ranging, which you are paying up for with the 400 verse the 300 is a nice feature, but generally for diy around the home not that important a feature in my opinion.

I do find the low impediace feature very nice....but your not going to get that untill up in the more expensive units....plus you can always use a cheap analytic meter or a low voltage light bulb in case you runi into ghost voltage. I guess I like the low impediance feature as my kids in Cali runi into old wired homes that tend to create greater ghost voltage issues.

But the 300 or 400 is great for a beginner.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ok Cool. Yes, of course. Absolutely I would ask questions.

Any suggestions for online education for this subject?
 

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It's cat III rated, and decent features. I usually recommend a amp clamp, as it's useful for DIY hvac work too. Being able to read capacitance is a nice to have, if you can find one within your budget. Prices have skyrocketed recently, but I really like the testo 770. (I personally have 2 × 770-3, but they are overkill for you.) Unfortunately they gave been discontinued and haven't been replaced yet.
 

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There is a separate battery compartment. You should read all the instructions before jumping to unreasonable conclusions.
The warning was two pages past that note about the batteries.
 
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It's a beauty.

Checking caps with a regular DVM, a load, an ammeter and 120v is pretty cumbersome. But I hardly ever have to do it.
 

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Do note the comment of MTN REMODEL LLC at Post #11
I do find the low impediace feature very nice....but your not going to get that untill up in the more expensive units....plus you can always use a cheap analytic meter or a low voltage light bulb in case you runi into ghost voltage. I guess I like the low impediance feature as my kids in Cali runi into old wired homes that tend to create greater ghost voltage issues.
This meter has an input impedance of 10 MΩ when reading voltage - which can be good, if one is reading the voltage across components on the "circuit board" of a working electronic device!
What MTN REMODEL LLC means is that you do not get the option of having a "Low Impedance" for reading voltages built into a Digital meter until you get to higher priced models!

When measuring voltages in "House Wiring" with a High Impedance meter (such as this), you are likely to have the meter "read" voltages which are there but are not able to produce any significant current across lower impedance devices - such as light bulbs.
These voltage readings are often termed "Ghost Voltages" (or Phantom Voltages) and are caused by induction, leakage etc.

A meter having a (relatively) low impedance, such a "cheap" analog meter, will provide a "drain" on these voltages and NOT "read" them - or, at least, indicate a much lower voltage than would be "read" by a "High Impedance" meter.

Hence, if you do have a need for a meter such as the "Klein model# MM400" , buy it.
However, if you do not wish to "muck about" with additional "shunts" when measuring voltages in "House Wiring", you should ALSO obtain a "cheap" analog meter - such as this.
This meter has an impedance of 2 kΩ/Volt.
Hence, on the 250 V scale, its Impedance would be 500 kΩ (or 0.5 MΩ)

If you are going to use the meter only for "automotive and home electrical testing" (initially), it would probably be better to purchase a (cheap) analog meter - such as the above - and a (cheap) digital meter, such as 7 Fn Digital Multimeter AC DC Voltage Volt 10 Amp Current Resistance Ohm Meter | eBay - for more "precise" readings - for a total of about $16.00

If you find that you do "need" it, the "Klein model# MM400" could come later and you would have gained experience for only $16.00.
(Also, if you happen to damage either of these lower priced meters, you would be "down" only $8.00 or so.)
 

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Do note that they are not safety listed. I believe that I've had those exact models. (Hard to believe that someone is still knocking them off at all these years.) I blew the analog one up, selecting the wrong scale, long before I knew better
 

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Do note the comment of MTN REMODEL LLC at Post #11

This meter has an input impedance of 10 MΩ when reading voltage - which can be good, if one is reading the voltage across components on the "circuit board" of a working electronic device!
What MTN REMODEL LLC means is that you do not get the option of having a "Low Impedance" for reading voltages built into a Digital meter until you get to higher priced models!

When measuring voltages in "House Wiring" with a High Impedance meter (such as this), you are likely to have the meter "read" voltages which are there but are not able to produce any significant current across lower impedance devices - such as light bulbs.
These voltage readings are often termed "Ghost Voltages" (or Phantom Voltages) and are caused by induction, leakage etc.

A meter having a (relatively) low impedance, such a "cheap" analog meter, will provide a "drain" on these voltages and NOT "read" them - or, at least, indicate a much lower voltage than would be "read" by a "High Impedance" meter.

Hence, if you do have a need for a meter such as the "Klein model# MM400" , buy it.
However, if you do not wish to "muck about" with additional "shunts" when measuring voltages in "House Wiring", you should ALSO obtain a "cheap" analog meter - such as this.
This meter has an impedance of 2 kΩ/Volt.
Hence, on the 250 V scale, its Impedance would be 500 kΩ (or 0.5 MΩ)

If you are going to use the meter only for "automotive and home electrical testing" (initially), it would probably be better to purchase a (cheap) analog meter - such as the above - and a (cheap) digital meter, such as 7 Fn Digital Multimeter AC DC Voltage Volt 10 Amp Current Resistance Ohm Meter | eBay - for more "precise" readings - for a total of about $16.00

If you find that you do "need" it, the "Klein model# MM400" could come later and you would have gained experience for only $16.00.
(Also, if you happen to damage either of these lower priced meters, you would be "down" only $8.00 or so.)
I should have read the entire spec sheet. :(
If I didn't already have a 4-1/2 digit DVM & a bag full of test equipment I'd buy this meter in a microsecond.
 
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