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I have a giant tree whose root system has caused damages to a concrete driverway and the foundation.

In the picture below you can kind of see what it did to the underside of the two central AC compressors.






I cut down the tree last week. Now I need to lift up all these patio stones, and jack up my driveway. Then I am going to hire a landscape company to come and grind up the roots.




Is there a way to set aside the two AC compressors so the stump grinder can grind the uplifting roots under the pads?


Is the only option to get an AC tech to come disconnect the systems, store the coolant, move the units out of the way, then have the stump grinder come and do it's things, then have the AC tech come back to reconnect and recharge? Or is there a more creative way?
 

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No, I don't see that happening. You'll have to get a HVAC tech to pump the systems down and disconnect them if you insist on grinding the roots.

You may consider leveling them and putting some 3/4 aggregate or whatever under them and leaving the roots alone.
 

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I've moved mine up a few inches, because over the years it sank into the ground as backfill around the house settled. Lifted it carefully and slowly, and slid two 4x4's under it. That was many years ago. You have to look at the geometry of the copper and see what you can get away with. In my case I was just putting it back where it used to be and you could be in the same situation.
 

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Unfortunately its not going to be a yes or no answer.There are a few things that would determine if it could be done easily.
The main one is how much refrigerant tubing is between the house and condenser.The pictures dont show.I have suspended and moved a few units for similar reasons, but they had a minimum of at least 18" of copper, so kinking the tubing was less likely to happen.
Going by how close these are to the house and to each other, they will probably need to be pumped back and cut out.
And yes, it will probably cost about $1000 to do it properly .
 

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Working with each one individually, I'd rig them for support without lifting them any more than absolutely necessary. Then I'd pull those paver tiles out from under them. It won't do any line damage to let it back down to level, so providing some makeshift supports that will let it level out when setting it back down should be good enough until the time comes to replace the units from normal failure.

Even though I did this stuff for 40 years and am still fully equipped and able to pump them down, disconnect and seal them off and later reconnect and evacuate them, I wouldn't do it until all else failed. I advise the OP to give it his best shot since the refer man won't charge any more for you trying and failing.

I will add that $1000 sounds pretty high for what I could do in two quick easy service calls. Sounds like I could make in excess of $200.hr without getting the ladder off the truck. I recommend he shop around if he gets a bid that high. Some HVAC contractors are hungrier than others.
 
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You could hang them from the rafter tails and tunnel under them but I think removing them and getting equipment in there would make more sense.
 
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