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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there,
So we install 2 layers of drywall on these channels at ceiling , but something is wrong, so we have to take it off 2 layers of drywall, and re-install the 2 layers of drywall. Since now the first 2 layer of drywall leave many screw holes in the channel like the photo, should I worry about the channel may not be good for holding the new 2 layer of drywall?
Textile Wood Packing materials Beige Ingredient
 

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Building my last home
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It is called hat channel.

Your picture does not show the hat channel attached to the wood. For a ceiling you must have a decent framing screw in the hat channel into the wood, every place. In the pic you need 4 screws of at least one inch long. I would not use drywall screws for framing.

You can use the drill point if you like,
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys, it's 12 gauge furring hat channel. I'm sure it can hold 2 layer of drywall.

My question is , since we install and remove 2 layers of drywall, it left some screw holes on there. When doing new 2 layers of drywall, maybe the guys screw it to a place where it's very very close to the previous screw holes and make that screw loose and not holding tight, that's why I worry it may be easier to fall down in consideration of a earthquake.
However, I also think, since there're many screws there maybe one or two screw holes close to the previous screw holes doesn't matter, and does not worth the trouble of bring down everything and replace the channel ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I think you are correct and it will be fine.
I actually I denied myself now. In case of an earthquake, I could have 20 screws holding, but now because one or two screws could be loose (if it's nailed too close to the previous holes) I may only have 18 screws holding the drywall instead of 20, which weakens the ability to anti-earthquake.
 

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I actually I denied myself now. In case of an earthquake, I could have 20 screws holding, but now because one or two screws could be loose (if it's nailed too close to the previous holes) I may only have 18 screws holding the drywall instead of 20, which weakens the ability to anti-earthquake.
You are spending 2 much time thinking. If you drive a screw in that strips the hole you know it. You remove the screw and one inch and drive a new one. You screw up one sheet and then another, so non of the screws are working double hard.
 

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retired framer
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so non of the screws are working double hard -->what do you mean ? we'll re do the ceiling, replace the channel and re do the dry wall
You screw up one sheet with 1 1/4" screws, then you screw up the next sheet with 1 5/8 screws.
So each screw is holding up a little portion of one sheet. so 24 screws in a 58 pound sheet, each screw is holding up 2 1/2 pounds. You are worried about nothing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You screw up one sheet with 1 1/4" screws, then you screw up the next sheet with 1 5/8 screws.
So each screw is holding up a little portion of one sheet. so 24 screws in a 58 pound sheet, each screw is holding up 2 1/2 pounds. You are worried about nothing.
If I got 3 screws lose in one sheet, meaning in case of an earthquake, it could be losing 7 1/2 pound holding power
 

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When in doubt just change your screw pattern by decreasing the spread by 2". Instead of 8" do 6", etc.
 
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