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They're all fixer-uppers
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Discussion Starter #1
I am remodeling a bathroom. Getting ready to drywall the wall in back of th vanity. The existing supply lines coming out of the wall have shutoff valves. In order for me to fit the drywall tightly around the pipe and use an escutcheon to the wall, I would have to remove the shutoff valves.. not a huge deal, but this whole area will be hidden by the vanity and I could actually just cut a long rectangle in the drywall and slip it over everything. Is this bad practice??
 

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the Musigician
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i've seen it done...... however, it'll allow easier access to rodent/bugs/drafts

DM
 

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Member
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I would do as you say cut the large rectangle. Then put a filler patch in after it's installed, using dura-bond to tape and fill in round the pipe, no one will be the wiser. While you could leave it open...I'd prefer not to....but that's just me.
 

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Newbie Bill
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Couldn't you just use two pieces of drywall? One that comes up to the pipes from the bottom and one coming down to the pipes from the top. Then you would only have one joint.
 

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They're all fixer-uppers
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Discussion Starter #5
Couldn't you just use two pieces of drywall? One that comes up to the pipes from the bottom and one coming down to the pipes from the top. Then you would only have one joint.
Maybe if I was hiring out the finishing... :laughing:

Seriously though, I'd rather deal with the pipes than make an extra seam to tape. Thanks for the suggestion though.
 

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Drywall contractor
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Cut the hole big enough to go over the supply and patch around it would be the easiest. If it's under the cabinet, it's up to you if you want to do it or not...
 

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Newbie Bill
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Maybe if I was hiring out the finishing... :laughing:

Seriously though, I'd rather deal with the pipes than make an extra seam to tape. Thanks for the suggestion though.
I figured the joint would be behind the vanity so finishing wouldn't be an issue.
 

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Registered
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Why not shut the water down, remove the shut offs, put caps on the plumbing, install the drywall, install the cabinet, install the shut offs? This way you end up with no seams or joints in the drywall, and holes just the size of the pipes
 

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Member
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Why not shut the water down, remove the shut offs, put caps on the plumbing, install the drywall, install the cabinet, install the shut offs? This way you end up with no seams or joints in the drywall, and holes just the size of the pipes
Just guessing by the original and subsequent post, it seems as though he's looking for the easiest way out. You're right...it's not a big deal to do as you say...and it would look the best.
 

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They're all fixer-uppers
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Discussion Starter #14
Just guessing by the original and subsequent post, it seems as though he's looking for the easiest way out. You're right...it's not a big deal to do as you say...and it would look the best.

Not really. As I said originally, if removing them is the right thing to do, no big deal. I just wanted to make sure I wasn't going to the trouble for no reason is all. I was curious about general practice, as if someone may have said "no, typically people just cut around them as everything is hidden"... or "you can do it any which you that works, but the best thing to do is take all the shutoffs off, cap the plumbing and go that route".
 

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You should remove the valves If you don't you will have to drill two large holes in the cabinet to get valves in the cabinet. That will look like do do
 

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I remove the valves and replace with new after I've put the drywall up. The original valves were old, and the newer 1/4 turn valves seal better anyway.
 
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