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Hello everyone,

I was wondering if anyone would have some advice. I am installing some decorative 3/16" hdf wainscoting paneling in one of my rooms. There are two electrical outlets I have to deal with on the wall. I see some sites advising to always use outlet extenders, but the smallest ones I can find are 1/2". When using the thin paneling, is the extension necessary?

Thank you!
 

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Only 3/16, no don't worry about it. Worst case if you need to bring the receptacle out a little bit, you can put a nut on each screw that holds the receptacle in between the receptacle and box, that extends the receptacle but also keeps it tight. You probably won't need to worry about doing that here, but just in case, that's an option.
 

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Very Stable Genius
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Our code requires that the box be no more than 6mm back from the surface.
Nonetheless I'm not sure I'd bother with an extender in your case.
If you do choose to have an extender, the type below slides inside so that it
fills any gap.
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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The nut is an option.

I have worked with licensed electricians, that take the insulation that they removed from the wires , when hooking up the device ( outlet / switch ), and inserting the device screw into the stripped insulation, the length needed to make the device stand proud of the box, just enough to be flush with the paneled surface.

No extender needed.


ED
 

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Very Stable Genius
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The nut is an option.

I have worked with licensed electricians, that take the insulation that they removed from the wires , when hooking up the device ( outlet / switch ), and inserting the device screw into the stripped insulation, the length needed to make the device stand proud of the box, just enough to be flush with the paneled surface.

No extender needed.

ED
That doesn't fulfill the requirement that an extender is designed/intended
for. The intent is that the flame proof/resistant nature of the box not be
compromised by being set back into flammable material.
 

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The spacers like the nuts or insulation do not provide the coverage to contain any spark from potentially igniting the wall finish. The NEC only allows 1/4" recess from a combustible surface.

The Arlington BE--1 will adjust to thinner than 1/2". Codematters posted a picture of them.
 

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Very Stable Genius
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My statement above regarding 6mm max the box can be recessed is
inaccurate in this context.
Our code allows max 6mm where the wall/ceiling is non-combustible.
When combustible (ie hdf wainscotting) the box is required to be
flush or protruding.
code ref 12-3016
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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That doesn't fulfill the requirement that an extender is designed/intended
for. The intent is that the flame proof/resistant nature of the box not be
compromised by being set back into flammable material.
Thank you for the clarification.

I always thought that the Electrical Contractor doing that with the insulating sheath was odd, now I know why.


ED
 
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