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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My dear husband is installing a new sink in our guest bathroom, and he says that the pipe coming out of the wall is rusted, and uneven, and that it doesn't connect properly to the new pipe that he got to connect it to the sink, and thus it is leaking.

His solution is to caulk the hell out of it (see photos a few posts below)... this can't be good, right???

:help:
 

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Your picture did not post--but the picture in my mind is good enough!!:laughing:

Time to do it right---Replace the rusted pipe---even if it means opening the wall ----get that picture up and somebody here will tell you what is needed----Mike----
 

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Sorry link says 'photo not available'--------------------Your husband isn't looking over your shoulder
and sabotaging you is he?:laughing:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well, I'm not sure why the photo isn't working. Maybe Flickr is being a pain about its photo hosting... last try at a link:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/amber_ruby/5902746849/

Basically, he just has several layers of silicone caulk surrounding the entire connection between the two pipes.

Replacing the old pipe is not an option at this point. We have guests coming to stay with us next weekend and we need to get this bathroom sink finished this week. Our entire house, including all interior walls, is made of concrete block, so I can only imagine that replacing that pipe would be a major endeavor!

I guess if the caulk works in the interim, until we can do it "right", then so be it.

:(
 

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That's silicone, and it probably won't last long at all.

If I were to do that (and I wouldn't), i'd use something other than silicone, and something that isn't water soluble. Clean and dry the area around it first.
Biggest problem with this is hoping it comes off enough later to actually fix the problem. :eek::eek::eek:

Have you considered putting a bucket under it?

Another problem i see : You can't test your fix for many hours after. If it still leaks, then you have to rip it all off, and start over, and wait many hours to test again.

This is not a way to fix it at all, but with all that silicone it's going to be hard to tell you what to do. I'm sure it's something simple. Probably only take a couple of hours to tackle it.
 

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he could have at least tried to make it look pretty! The big glob in the first picture even looks like a chicken! Is he sure these pipes are even compatible? The pipe coming from the wall looks wayyyy bigger than the pipe coming from the cabinet.
 

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Another point : You've stopped the leak from showing, but that doesn't mean it isn't continuing to leak inside of the wall now that you've stopped it from leaking in the cabinet. You could be destroying sheetrock, and lumber by doing it this way. :no:
 

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Have him remove the caulking and fix the leak properly ASAP or call a plumber to repair it properly or it will cost you more in house damage later.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ok, so, the caulk is not a good solution. Before I break the bad news to him, is it at least a good temporary solution? We need the sink to not leak for one weekend, and I could at least encourage him to leave it as is, attach the vanity to the wall so that it doesn't tip over for guests, and see about finding a more lasting solution down the road...

Not sure what that solution is going to be, other than calling a plumber to assess the situation. From what he told me, the pipes are the correct match. I think the white pipe has a coupler that goes over the old metal pipe which is coming from the wall, and that might explain why in the picture they look to be different sizes. He told me that the old metal pipe doesn't have enough threads to be able to thread the new pipe on and get a decent hold (this was when I asked him if he's using pipe tape -- I guess he's not using pipe tape because there aren't enough threads?)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
That's silicone, and it probably won't last long at all.

Have you considered putting a bucket under it?
When you say it won't last long, how long is "not long"??

Also, there's no room for a bucket. In the photo, the vanity cabinet is pulled away from the wall to expose the pipe. When the vanity is positioned correctly, it's flat against the wall, and the silicone area will be mostly behind the vanity, and somewhat sticking into the hole cut in the back wall of the vanity. This means that if it leaks, it will leak partially behind the vanity, and partially into the vanity.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Another point : You've stopped the leak from showing, but that doesn't mean it isn't continuing to leak inside of the wall now that you've stopped it from leaking in the cabinet. You could be destroying sheetrock, and lumber by doing it this way. :no:
There is no sheetrock nor lumber in this house -- the interior walls are all concrete block. It would appear that they've attached tile backer board to the concrete walls in the bathroom, but I can assure you there's no wood between them.

I agree that there could be unseen water leaking backwards towards/into the wall. That's part of why I'm questioning the use of silicone this way. I'm just not sure my husband knows how else to fix it. I am afraid that the silicone will hold up long enough for him to think it's fixed permanently, and that something will start leaking again down the road after the sink is caulked to the wall, and I'd like to avoid that situation...
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
What about using epoxy putty? I found this website and it says "You can use epoxy putty for permanent repairs on drain pipes. These are not under pressure and contain water only when a fixture is in use."

I'm curious if this works when one pipe is metal and the other is PVC?

:001_unsure:
 

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If there is enough solid pipe sticking out of the wall a rubber 'fernco' type fitting could be used.

These are rubber tubes with pipe clamps--the come in various sizes including ones that taper from 1 1/2" to 1 1/4"

I would suggest a trip to the plumbing section of Home Depot and look at those.

That silicone job could hold up fine for years! Fish tanks are glued together with it.

However,It is funky looking---might leak if air pockets are present---and offer no adjustment.
 
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Looks like gal pipe to me. If the vanity has a back, can't you open up the blockwork and repair the leaking pipes, slide the vanity into place until your guests have left, then repair the wall?
 

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There is no sheetrock nor lumber in this house -- the interior walls are all concrete block. It would appear that they've attached tile backer board to the concrete walls in the bathroom, but I can assure you there's no wood between them.

I agree that there could be unseen water leaking backwards towards/into the wall. That's part of why I'm questioning the use of silicone this way. I'm just not sure my husband knows how else to fix it. I am afraid that the silicone will hold up long enough for him to think it's fixed permanently, and that something will start leaking again down the road after the sink is caulked to the wall, and I'd like to avoid that situation...
Ok, so your lumber isn't getting ruined because you don't have any. You're putting used sink water into the cavity of the concrete wall, where it will probably soak into the concrete block, and/or slab, turn septic, and start stinking.

In response to your question regarding "how long" I have no idea. I've never tried anything like this before, nor will I ever. I believe I would lose my job for doing something like that. :whistling2:
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
UPDATE: problem solved!!

Well, I told the husband that I didn't think the silicone was a good solution, and it turns out he agreed. He went back to the hardware store 2 or 3 times, and finally figured out a combination of pipes that ended up doing the trick.

Our drain pipe sticking out of the wall is male, so he found a female PVC pipe that had a longer area of threading. Also, this piece was straight, so he could see inside the two pipes as he threaded them together (and yes, he did use teflon tape!). From his description, he was then able to attach another pipe to this, and finally the J-shaped pipe that goes up to the sink drain.

I did tell him about the Fernco pipe, as suggested before, but the fellow at the hardware store said that it was no better than epoxy putty and would only be a temporary fix. Supposedly the way he has it rigged now should be permanent!

Oh, and by the way -- all that silicone he put on there apparently peeled off quite easily!

Anyway, thanks all for the suggestions, and for confirming my suspicions that caulk is definitely not the answer.

Cheers!

:thumbup:

 
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