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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So i am going to be needing to nail a lot to put up my beadboard ceiling. would it make sense to just buy a nail gun and rent the compressor? i can get one for cheap, like $30 or so.

also, would it be worth it to buy a compressor?
 

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Buy yourself a small compressor and nail gun---they use very little air--if you rent--you will wish you bought---see if there is a compressor/guns combo set on sale---
 
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Not going to find a nail gun worth buying for $30.00.
A combo set is most often the best value.
 
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With a small air compressor....you can air up tires....air up the kids balls....air up the kiddy pool.....blow out the ports on a carb....blow off the work bench....

And use it to drive in nails.

Shop CL...there are some good deals to be had....either a guy bought it for a project and no longer needs it or he is upgrading....

My wife uses my compressor during the summer all most as much as I do.
 

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I bought a compressor on sale at harbor freight for $30. Its a small crappy pancake compressor. I can only shoot a half dozen nails before i need to wait and have it recharge.
That be said it was a decent buy.
I will be buying a bigger used one soon, but for occasional homeowner use, the small size is ideal and worth the hassles of use.
I only rent tools if i cant justify storing it
 

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I think that 6 gallon one in the Lowes link is about right for an air nailer. If you might have to carry it up stairs, you really want something portable.

Mine is a tiny, light-weight 1 gallon; the smallest one they sell at Home Depot. I wouldn't use it to run an air nailer, but it gets all my household chores done -- filling tires and blowing dust out of tools and electronics. Its only feature is that it is tiny and light-weight!
 

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I think that 6 gallon one in the Lowes link is about right for an air nailer. If you might have to carry it up stairs, you really want something portable.

Mine is a tiny, light-weight 1 gallon; the smallest one they sell at Home Depot. I wouldn't use it to run an air nailer, but it gets all my household chores done -- filling tires and blowing dust out of tools and electronics. Its only feature is that it is tiny and light-weight!

a 6 gallon works fine for finish nailers, it can run a framing gun or roofing gun provided it has a rating of cfms also.. it needs to recover quickly for bigger guns..

now using a compressor and blow tool to blow dust out of electronics is a bad idea.. the tank collects moisture which then goes through the line and out the blow tool. you should be using canned dry air sold in the computer section or electronics department
 

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now using a compressor and blow tool to blow dust out of electronics is a bad idea.. the tank collects moisture which then goes through the line and out the blow tool. you should be using canned dry air sold in the computer section or electronics department
I was concerned about moisture in the compressed air also, but I tried it on a few things and found the small amount of water evaporates quickly. I've been cleaning computers and audio amplifiers with it for a couple of years and haven't had any trouble.

The "canned air" can cause condensation on parts, too, because it cools the parts. If you use canned air on a humid day you'll get condensation.

So I don't do it on humid days. :)

I considered buying a water separator for the compressed air, but after asking several colleagues, they all told me it was unnecessary. If I ever buy a larger shop compressor I would probably set it up with water and oil separation for cleaning, though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·

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"Factory reconditioned" products generally go through a better Q/A process than the same product coming off a normal production line.

The reason is obviously that the repair process is not the same for every unit and you don't want to put bad "reconditioned" product into your sales channel, any more than you want bad "new" ones.

The way I decide if I want a "factory reconditioned" product is the warranty. If the warranty is the same as buying new, I will take reconditioned, no problem!
 

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I have that brad nailer and it's a good tool. But I think you can do a good bit better with porter cable and maybe get 2 nailers every thing new.
 
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