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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New to this forum. I am having trouble interpreting NEC codes for my detached garage. For reference, I live in Charleston, SC. My home was built in October 2015 with a detached garage. The detached garage contains one GFCI outlet wired to two addition non-GFCI outlets. The entire garage power can be controlled with a switch on the garage wall. I have read two interpretations of codes. One being that this GFCI outlet needs to remain in all detached garages. The second interpretation states that a GFCI outlet is not needed if the breaker is a GFCI breaker. My garage breaker is found inside my home with all of my other home breakers in the same box. Can anyone help me identify the appropriate regulations? Is a GFCI breaker enough for regulations and the GFCI outlet can be removed putting 3 Non-GFCI outlets on the same line from the breaker box? Any info is much appreciated. I will provide any additional information if needed. Thanks.
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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Either a GFCI breaker or receptacle is compliant. If you have a breaker you don't need the receptacle or vice versa.

If the cable or conduit from house to garage is buried less than 24/18 inches you must use the breaker.

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Either a GFCI breaker or receptacle is compliant. If you have a breaker you don't need the receptacle or vice versa.

If the cable or conduit from house to garage is buried less than 24/18 inches you must use the breaker.

Sent from my Moto E (4) Plus using Tapatalk
Thanks for the response. That is helpful. The house box has a "garage" breaker that is fully functional. Nice to know they had both levels of protection in place. I appreciate your knowledge.
 

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I prefer the gfci in the detached garage. That way you can reset it easily if it trips.

Otherwise, you are taking a walk to the breaker box.

The switch controlling all the garage power is acting as the disconnect that is required for power in a detached structure.
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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I prefer the gfci in the detached garage. That way you can reset it easily if it trips.
As long as the cable/conduit feeder burial depth is compliant.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Is the garage breaker a GFCI breaker?
I am going to check this out. Thanks for the reminder to do so. Are GFCI breakers less sensitive than GFCI outlets? I have a refrigerator that for some reason trips the garage GFCI every few months. The refrigerator tests as being fine but I know this is tripping it. I have sensitive contents in the refrigerator so I want to make sure it does not shut off while maintaining safety. I am open to any suggestions. I want to work within code.
 
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