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Discussion Starter #1
G'day from Down Under!

I live in Australia and will travel to the U.S. with my family. We are too modern with five iPhones and iPads (in total). Charging the devices at airports will be a challenge because I doubt that we will be able to find enough outlets.

I would like to take an Australian multi-outlet strip rated for 240v and use an adapter plug for the U.S. to plug into the wall at the airport in Los Angeles. All of the iPhone and iPad adapters are universal voltage 110v - 240v, so the 110v from the U.S. airport flowing through the power strip should not be a problem.

Is there any safety concern with this approach? I know the other way could be a problem trying to use a 110v rated strip overseas, but my assumption is that the Australian model could more than handle the U.S. voltage.

Does it matter if the power strip has switches, fuses and neon lights?

Thank you, in advance, for your help.
 

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The neon light probably will not light up, but it should work. Electronics that are 100-240 volt rated will work in Australia as well as the US. Just to add frequency is 60Hz instead of 50 in the US but electronics still don't care.

Do have a picture of the outlet strip just to confirm its doable?
 

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Knows Enough to be Danger
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I did the opposite a year or so ago. US to Australia.

You're right though. most devices nowadays are good with 120-240V and 50-60 Hz. So it's not that critical.

Does your power strip happen to have any ratings or markings on it? I wouldn't be surprised if it did.
 

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120v Power strips are inexpensive. I'd buy one just for the visit. IMO.
I think his idea was one converter to power strip, for all his devices. Rather than a 120V strip, with a converter on each outlet!

Now you might be saying he should just buy some 120V USB chargers, and use his USB cables. Which isn't an awful idea, if he's just talking small electronics. :)
 

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120v Power strips are inexpensive. I'd buy one just for the visit. IMO.
Good point, however his electronic devices may have angled aussie plugs instead of our straight angled ones.


I think he is trying to use an assuie power strip with angled pins, but he will still need an adapter for the power strip's cord to go to a NEMA 5-15 outlet.


Just to clear up confusion I think this is what the OP might have (but could be wrong)
 

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Good point, however his electronic devices may have angled aussie plugs instead of our straight angled ones.


I think he is trying to use an assuie power strip with angled pins, but he will still need an adapter for the power strip's cord to go to a NEMA 5-15 outlet.


Just to clear up confusion I think this is what the OP might have (but could be wrong)
Good point. Stuck in USA mode.

http://www.amazon.com/CHOETECH-Desktop-Charger-Adapter-Technology/dp/B00MBDGVPM

How about this option?
 

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but my assumption is that the Australian model could more than handle the U.S. voltage.
The voltage should not be a problem, but the current could be. I looked up a power strip similar to the one shown. It was rated 10 amps 250 volts. That would give you about 5 amps at 120V, without exceeding the rating.
 

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The voltage should not be a problem, but the current could be. I looked up a power strip similar to the one shown. It was rated 10 amps 250 volts. That would give you about 5 amps at 120V, without exceeding the rating.
Why so? Amperage and current rating stay the same regardless of voltage.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Info about power strip

Wow! I woke up this morning in Melbourne and was amazed to find so many responses. THANK YOU to everyone who has been helping.

I will post a photo later today once my wife wakes up. The camera is in the bedroom.

To clarify a few points:

1) PaliBob's info about the Tom Bradley international terminal at Los Angeles Airport is great! My only problem will be that my kids will drain the batteries on the 14 hour flight to the U.S. We will only be at the international terminal when we land and then will go straight to a domestic terminal for the connecting flight. At that point, we will have a problem because I will need to charge up everything.

[The upgrade to the international terminal at the airport sounds amazing! The old building was awful.]

2) "Jump Start" is exactly right. All of my electronic devices were purchased in Australia, and they all have the angled plugs. For that reason, I want to use an Australian power strip. I would only need one adapter to plug into the wall.

As for the markings on the strip that I own, it is an HPM brand. "CAT 105 SERIES" "OVERLOAD PROTECTION" "240V AC MAX LOADING 10A" "2400W"

3) The Choetech 6 port USB charger looks amazing. I will check for some online reviews, but I think I will buy one in the U.S. for all future travel. It would solve lots of issues with compatibly and also vastly reduce the number of chargers that I need to pack.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Choetech

I just read some of the reviews on the Choetech. There are 75 in total on Amazon -- 69 with five stars and 6 at four stars! That is about as good as it ever gets. It will definitely be on the purchase list in the U.S. Now, I just need to see if I can get the Australian power strip to work going on the way over.
 

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Well a quick search showed you better check in with charged devices. Any device that doesn't turn on before flight will not be allowed on the plane.

Some carriers may offer inflight charging, depending on which class you're flying.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Cheap Adapters

Thanks!

CURIOUSB: The cheap adapters are probably not an option. I would still need enough outlets at the airport to charge up all the devices.

CLW1963: I will be forever indebted to you! I had completely forgotten that the U.S. requires devices to turn on at the security check in. I will now make sure that my wife and kids charge all the devices while I get the luggage at the carousel. That process usually takes about 20 minutes, which should be enough to get us through the security check. I will also see about the in-seat option on the plane. I think we are on an Airbus 380 in economy class.
 

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Why so? Amperage and current rating stay the same regardless of voltage.
I am thinking of his load amperage. He is used to loads at 230 or 240V.

Using the 240V as an example,
If he plugs in 10 amps at 240V at home, he gets 2400 watts. If he plugs in the same loads here, but he is transforming downstream of the powerstrip, the 2400 watts load will be 20 amps at 120V. This would overload the power strip.

He can only put 5 amps of "Australian load" (1200 watts @240V) on the power strip while operating the strip on US power. ([email protected]=10 amps)
 
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