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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi guys
this issue started over a week ago. sometimes my 30 year old Beckett RWB would run all day or night, but once in awhile I have to hit the reset. It does start up instantly when I do.
I did a complete serviced about a month ago, vacuum, nozzle, electrodes, filter. spark check, pump pressure test, smoke test, co2 test. draft check, stack temp.
Today it happened a few times.

This burner was underwater from Sandy 3 year ago, I did replace the motor, but the rest is original. this unit is attached to an older Arcoliner boiler equipped with tankless coil. the firing rate for this configuration is 1.25GPH.
I'm using an 80* solid 1GPH nozzle. According to the book this nozzle at 140PSI is delivering 1.20GPH

I don't think the boiler is over fired.

Today I went through it, reset the electrodes, no change. changed the nozzle, no change, checked the spark, Ran a Pump test and got 100PSI. Can low pump pressure cause intermittent no starts.


I'm almost positive, I sometimes can't remember what I had for breakfast, I'm old and getting older, It always ran at about 140PSI. I adjusted the pump back up to 140, which maxed out the adjuster. The pump has no internal filter. The burner sounds better and heats up a little faster I think.

It has restarted several times since. If it continues to run I am going to assume that I have found the problem of intermittent no starts. A pump that is getting tired. and pick up a new one.

If it is the pump any suggestions as to which one to buy?

I finished very late so I didn't test anything. If it runs all night, it hasn't for about a week,I will test for smoke, co2 and the rest tomorrow.

any opinions.

Thanks in advance.

PS> you guys just helped me with my sons 2 zone hook up.

Ralph
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
no strainer it's a rock crusher
unfortunately the one test tool I don't have is a Vacuum gauge.

I just checked for smoke. adjusted to zero smoke. It was zero but just to be sure I set it for a trace and then back to zero.
Stack temp was 625. It's always that high.
I have thought about putting a refractory brick or 2 in the upper section to slow down the circulation but I have as of yet.

I didn't check the co2 yet it was lunch time.

I ran all night and its been starting instantly so far today. No delay whatsoever.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Just ran co2 test twice= 8%
stack temp 625
room temp 70

burner efficiency=Mid 70'S

I'm happy with that- best of all so far no more no starts.

any suggestions as to which pump I should buy?
 

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Just ran co2 test twice= 8%
stack temp 625
room temp 70

burner efficiency=Mid 70'S

I'm happy with that- best of all so far no more no starts.

any suggestions as to which pump I should buy?
How dirty is your smoke. Looks like you have reduced combustion air pretty low, to get that low of a CO2 readings.

Thought you had a Beckett burner. If so, mid 70s is not good.
 

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Is the boiler clean inside. That's a high stack temp, your waisting a ton of energy.
Don't try to "slow down the circulation". Improper draft will cause all sorts of issues.
Seems almost like its overfired.
 

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Is the boiler clean inside. That's a high stack temp, your waisting a ton of energy.
Don't try to "slow down the circulation". Improper draft will cause all sorts of issues.
Seems almost like its overfired.

If they pump pressure is increased without adding air, then the oil is still burning as it gets to the higher passages of eh boiler. Causing high stack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Hi Beenthere
It's an old old Beckett- 25 years or so.
I have zero smoke.
I first checked it, it was zero. Backed off air till I got a trace then reset to zero smoke.

That stack temp is the same as it has always been.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Hi Roughneck
Thanks for the input.
Yes the boiler is clean. there is slight, very light trace of soot. Probably from the way it was stumbling for the past week.
If it continues to run as it has last night and today, I will clean it again. it has only been a month since the last cleaning.

the stack temp has always been the same for the past 25 years that I have been taking care of it.

There was a tag on the boiler from a tech that serviced it last along time ago, his test showed low 70 before mid 70s after.

From what I've been told- this old Arcoliner is only good as a boat anchor.

My first concern was correcting the no start issue.

If that is good I will tend to the other things later.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hey Beenthere
there is no ID info on the unit except the letters RWB near the name Beckett

How do I figure out what exact Beckett this is??

all I do know is that it is a retention head burner.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
THANKS
Yes it is an AF I just found how to ID it By the Blower assy.
Off the top of your head if I were to change from 80* B 1GPH to a 80* B .85GPH
both running with a pump pressure of 140 besides dropping the firing rate to about 1GPH.
what effect would that have on the nos. I get if I change nothing else.
Would it cause higher co2 lower stack temp.etc.
or do I have to actually install one and run the test

I'm just trying to figure out the logic in deciding how to choose the right nozzle.

I read the Devlan booklet informative but a little too technical for me.

I have just been following what the last tech left me with- if I can improve on that I'd like to.
 

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Lowering firing rate without lowering air will cause a lower Co2. Plus lower stack.

Check your flame retention head. It may be damaged. Also, it may be the wrong size for a lower firing rate.
 
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Technically, the boilers listed firing rate.

However. You can often down fire to a rate half way between your homes heatloss, and the boilers listed firing rate. And improve fuel use.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Hi again
I just tested the draft of my unit.
I got .8 at the breach and .5 over the fire.

I have been doing some research and I guess these numbers are high.

I don't have a draft regulator

and if I installed one it would be in an almost horizontal pipe, the flue exits the rear of the boiler,tight but I might be able to do it

Would that be ok and would that help with my low co2- 8%
and high stack temp= 625

By the way the burner hasn't miss a beat since I raise the pump pressure back to 140 from the 100 that I found.

Thanks
Ralph
 

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Nothing wrong with a barometric on a horizontal pipe. Most likely will save you a good amount of oil, not sucking all of that heat up the chimney.

At 140 PSIG, the oil droplets are much smaller, and easier to ignite.
 
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You too.

PS. Just a friendly FYI, some people use screen readers, and they will read very loudly when reading all caps sentences. It's considered yelling in the online world. Again have a Happy New Year.

Cheers!
 
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