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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone. I was hoping to get some advice on insulating my garage. We normally keep our fig & lemon trees inside the garage for the winter. In our previous home the garage was sandwiched between our kitchen and another room in the house. So in the winter time it was relatively warm. In our new house the garage is in the corner of the house and it's gets cold in there. Also I noticed that during the summer we would get a fair amount of bugs along the sill plate where the concrete foundation met the beginning of gypsum board (walls). I also noticed that in one section I could actually see the sunlight on a very sunny day. So it's safe to say insulation in pretty non existent. I also have seen a decent amount of bug which are dead because we had our pest control guy spray before the beginning of the spring.

My brother recommended using great stuff to apply as insulation near the sill plate/foundation. Essentially the method suggested was to either apply the foam between the openings. And for areas where the openings were more difficult to access, drill a pilot hole large enough to stick the tub from the great stuff plastic nozzle to fit and apply. For a garage I am wondering if this is the best method or if I should remove the gypsum boards and properly insulate the garage.
 

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Dabbing some great stuff here and there will have little effect and insulating without supplying heat doesn't work. You would be getting some heat from the common wall with the house but not a lot.

Now, insulating and raising the temperature out there introduces moisture issues, warm air holds more moisture which can get deposited onto colder surfaces.

A smaller space specific for your trees, insulated and heated, would be a lot easier than doing the entire garage.

Where are you, how cold are those winters?

Bud
 

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Stopping air (and insect) infiltration is always a good idea. In a garage though, there is more than just the sill to worry about. Garage doors are notoriously drafty too, but they sell sealing kits for them that can cut down on the air flow.
A can of foam or a tube of caulk are cheap, and if you cut down on the air movement whatever room is next to the garage will benefit a little too. No major downside to it that I can think of.
Tearing out the drywall might be a little drastic though. Do you know for sure that there is no insulation in those walls? You can drill some little holes to check. If the stud bays are truly empty, you can blow in cellulose through 2" holes without having to take the sheetrock down. There'll be some patching, but it beats hanging, taping, and mudding the entire space.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Most if the heat if you have any heat will be lost thru the ceiling.. You might be better off with a couple light bulbs burning in a makeshift tent in the garage,

My sons bedroom is directly above the garage. The back connect straight into the house. The left side is about halfway flush with the house. And the right is exposed outside. If that helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Dabbing some great stuff here and there will have little effect and insulating without supplying heat doesn't work. You would be getting some heat from the common wall with the house but not a lot.

Now, insulating and raising the temperature out there introduces moisture issues, warm air holds more moisture which can get deposited onto colder surfaces.

A smaller space specific for your trees, insulated and heated, would be a lot easier than doing the entire garage.

Where are you, how cold are those winters?

Bud


I am located in New York. Westchester County.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Stopping air (and insect) infiltration is always a good idea. In a garage though, there is more than just the sill to worry about. Garage doors are notoriously drafty too, but they sell sealing kits for them that can cut down on the air flow.
A can of foam or a tube of caulk are cheap, and if you cut down on the air movement whatever room is next to the garage will benefit a little too. No major downside to it that I can think of.
Tearing out the drywall might be a little drastic though. Do you know for sure that there is no insulation in those walls? You can drill some little holes to check. If the stud bays are truly empty, you can blow in cellulose through 2" holes without having to take the sheetrock down. There'll be some patching, but it beats hanging, taping, and mudding the entire space.

Well I don't know for sure and being that winter is around the corner I doubt that I want to pull everything down just in case I don't have time to finish it. Maybe I can get one of this camera probes and drill a small hole to find out.
 

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Lemon and orange trees look good, I bring ours in for the Georgia 'winter' and put one or two in each room, right by the windows.

Real fig trees are kind of ugly otoh. I put ours in the basement covered with black glad bags. More important to keep the figs dark than cold.
 

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Maybe I can get one of this camera probes and drill a small hole to find out.
You don't need a camera probe. Drill a 3/4 inch hole and you can see it clearly if it has insulation or not. Of course, you will want to patch that hole right away. It's the kind of thing that you think you'll get to later...which becomes years from now or the day before you put your house on the market.
 
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