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Discussion Starter #1
we renovated the back room of our house recently and only now that the dead of winter is upon us, am I moved to work on insulating it better. (this is Toronto, Canada and this week we got down to -25C/-13F so the furnace cannot even keep up)

There are three issues (I think). #1 (weatherproofing) I think I can handle.
#2 I'll present here. (#3 in a separate post)

But we cut a new opening in the double brick for an entry door. the brick walls are freezing cold. I am planning on cladding the 5" exposed edges of the brick with 1/2" R3 rigid foam board before installing the moulding.

Is this a useful exercise? I mean the brick is still going to be as cold behind the foam board, even though the foam board does not feel cold.
The wall is double brick on the outside - this is an 1875 Victorian - , vertical 1" thick strapping (furring?) at 16" centers and plaster wall on the inside. (so there is a 1" air gap between the plaster and the brick.)

In another post I am going to ask about insulating the entire exterior wall (which is also very cold).
 

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3 points to make as you like to go with numbers.
1. You waited much too long (as you know). Difficult to anything when it is this cold especially when it involves opening that door.
2. Air sealing is perhaps the most critical step. Can foam is nearly impossible to use against those very cold bricks so consider caulking.
3. I suspect the work you are doing is only a tiny part of your heat loss. Not to discourage you, but you need guidance as to where to put your efforts. With these cold temperatures it is a perfect time to rent or hire someone with an infrared camera. Kick on a few exhaust fans to encourage infiltration and use that camera to spot the leaks and cold areas.

That's a difficult house so the need for a plan is even greater.

Bud
 
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Discussion Starter #3
If this pink foam board makes any sense, my plan was to shoot expanding insulating foam in along the opening first, then slam the foam board pieces in place with construction glue (there's a special type of glue that does not eat into the foam) and brace it all in place and let the spray foam expand and fill the air gaps.

question. will that expansion insulating foam eat the pink rigid foam board?
 

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My experience with Great stuff, both high and low expansion is, you had better have everything in place when you inject the foam. Any disturbance after it is out of the can will cause it to collapse and it doesn't recover well.

If you position all rigid pieces allowing some gaps and drilling holes in other places you can shoot the foam directly to where you want it. Window and door can foam expands less but it still expands so be sure the door is secure.

As for compatibility they frequently use the can foam to seal and secure the pink or blue.
http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/community/forum/general-questions/17937/does-polyurethane-foam-degrade-rigid-eps

Bud
 

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There is a glue that is suitable for Styrene materials.
It is the stuff you would use for plastic shower stall liners.
That is what I would use for glue. NOT PL 400.
I think it is PL 200, but check the labels carefully.
 

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It's PL300. (Foam adhesive). From the looks of it you have plenty of room, so I would probably embed a layer of 1 1/2" of foam on all three sides of those brick jambs after you use door and window foam around your door jamb. Place some 1/2" plywood on top of that, (temporary bracing) then wedge several 2x4s in between that are all the same length (so that the foam will be parallel). After the spray foam has set up, remove the 2x4s and plywood and you are ready for a final extension jamb, either wood or drywall return.

That's got to be one cold house.
 
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