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Discussion Starter #1
We are installing thin brick on the exterior of a small sunroom. I have installed two layers of Tyvek as required and am about to install the lath used to attach the thin brick. It seems to me there should be a small gap between the lath and the Tyvek so the scratch coat can get behind the wire mesh of the lath and "lock" into place. Is this correct? Or do I simply make the lath tight to the surface of the outer layer of Tyvek? Thank you.

Richard
 

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We are installing thin brick on the exterior of a small sunroom. I have installed two layers of Tyvek as required and am about to install the lath used to attach the thin brick. It seems to me there should be a small gap between the lath and the Tyvek so the scratch coat can get behind the wire mesh of the lath and "lock" into place. Is this correct? Or do I simply make the lath tight to the surface of the outer layer of Tyvek? Thank you.

Richard
Good morning Richard.
I've never done this type of DIY job but googling I found the following from one manufacturer of mesh. If you have already purchased the lath possibly you could modify yours to be self furred.
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SELF-FURRED DIAMOND MESH LATH
is used extensively in exterior stucco work over sheathing and as a plaster base over masonry walls. Self-furring dimples or embossed “V” ribs (“V” groove) hold the lath approximately ¼ inch away from solid surfaces to aid in the keying of stucco to the lath.

AMICO self-furred lath does not require additional self-furring mechanisms to function as required by ASTM C1063.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I found some of this lathe you pictured and purchased it. Unfortunately there is a layer of regular mesh already installed. I am wondering if I can install this type of lathe over the layer already there or if the original layer needs to be removed. It will be difficult to remove without harming the Tyvek which of course has already been installed around openings.
 

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The only real down side that I can see is that you're overall scratch coat thickness is going to get a little thicker, and thus add more weight. Not sure what the framing is or how big the walls are, but it should be fine........

BTW, you're going to want to get the scratch coat as flat as possible as thin brick show imperfections from below much easier than stone........
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for all that information. It's many things I haven't considered and the insights are appreciated.
 
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