DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Remodeling a beach condo on florida's east cost. Was going to rip up all the existing tile with a rented tile scraper to get the floors all cleaned up, leveled and smooth (bedrooms have carpet). We are wanting to install a single common continuous flooring type throughout the whole condo (excluding bathrooms). Approximately 2400 sq ft. Max length would be the hallway that stretches from the front to the back (with the planks running in that direction) and I guestimate it's about 55' long?

We want to go with floating click style wood LVP planks, thick (6+mm?), 20mil, waterproof and must be green (no chemicals, etc). Right now I like coretec, but not cheap. My wife likes one from SFI but I can't find anything indicating they are chemical free.

So my questions are:
1) Is having a floorscore enough to indicate it's chemical free? I see some brands with a floor score, but they only mention one chemical like formaldehyde, but don't mention phthalates.
2) I see some floors mention max sq ft and max run length. What happens for those floors I find that don't mention any limits?
3) Is it possible to install backwards? I was going to start my 1st run down that main hallway to get my 1st line anchored. Problem is there are 2 rooms that would then be backwards from that line. Even if I start in the furthest room on either side, at some point I'm going to be coming around a corner and need to install backwards. What then?
4) Should I consider gluing down the one plank at the various doors to 'separate' each room?
5) Should I consider sealing with silicone the flooring near the beach sliding glass doors? It would be all hidden under the molding. Hopefully avoid any water that does make it past the sliders from getting under the floor?


And then of course, should I even go LVP?

I was going to tile it with wood style plank tile (I have done limited tile before, like our entire bathroom, shower, etc). I would have to have some small grout line and would use one of those various tile leveling/spacer kits. I'd also need to put down some sound insulation 1st. Just seems like LVP is way easier and in a decade or so, if need be, would be that much easier to replace.

My wife has also found something new called waterproof laminate. They gave us a sample and we soaked it and it still looks good.
 

·
JUSTA MEMBER
Joined
·
15,241 Posts
Most of the manufacturers make a spline to use as a way to reverse the planks.

You just use the spline in an open groove, turning it into your tongue, and continuing the installation.

This turns the planks around .



ED
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I've seen splines for actual hardwood floors and reversing direction there, but I think click/lock LVP is different. I googled but can't find any splines for LVP.

Isn't hardwood normally installed with the tongue out so you can nail at that angle (at least that's how I did my hardwood floor upstairs). The spline helps easily create a new tongue on the opposite side to reverse direction.

LVP however I think is installed groove out 1st and the next plank's tongue is dropped into the prior groove at an angle and then dropped and locked in place. Also, the tongue and groove are not symmetrical like on hardwood flooring.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top