DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm interested in installing a clawfoot tub as a drop in - with normal use being the shower and an occasional soak in the tub. The challenge is that the tub will create a lip above the deck which will need to be sloped and drained or some other drain option. My intention is to install it with a curb and shower door on a 36" wide bathing space. Alternatively undermount the tub - all of which will be challenging with the curved lip on top of the tub and the curves in the outline of the tub. I'm wanting to do this because I've found a 48" clawfoot tub - very little hot water to fill it to get a deep, hot soak. My legs will have to be out of the tub to soak my torso , but I have to do that in a 5' tub anyway.



Surely this installation has been done by others. Any tips on either draining the perimeter for drop in application or on draining the drainage membrane into the tub (undermount) and cleanly tiling around the curve?


Thanks.


Scott






...
 

·
retired framer
Joined
·
44,288 Posts
Interesting, 2 thoughts come to mind.
1. under mount and have the surround made out of solid stone like a counter top.
Making it slope to the tub might add problems and would require 4 onsite joins

2. put a shower drain in the surround and pipe it to the tub overflow so there would be no trap needed.

Making it slope to the drain would be like a shower pan after the tub is in. Sealing it would be near impossible.

You could build the curb first with a raised inside edge but that would require dropping the tub into it, that does not sound like fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,008 Posts
Seems like more work than just buying a short alcove tub like this one, unless you already have the claw-foot. The deck issue could be solved by using mosaic-sized tiles on the deck area immediately adjacent to the tub—those could easily be shaped to drain with compound curves.

It would sure help if we could see pics of the space you plan to use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
The Alcove tub is a great idea for sure. I'd not seen one that small. I was wanting cast iron for durability and the clawfoot shape is darn cute - but not practical. Might have to reconsider for this enameled steel option that can be tiled to and drained.



I don't have pics of the space that I'm planning to use. This will be new construction. The space is intended to be a 12x12x12 building that can be moved - and contain separate bathing and toilet space and kitchen. (including "crawlspace" for holding tanks) Pretty darn tight.
 

·
Hammered Thumb
Joined
·
3,501 Posts
The space is intended to be a 12x12x12 building that can be moved
Wouldn't weight be a concern? And all the caulk required to seal the compound curves creating gaps an artisan probably can't even close? And maybe placement in the footprint when filled? So wouldn't acrylic be better?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I'm chemically sensitive (healthy home builder - very interested in tiny houses/ spaces.) I've actually been pondering a tub that would address all of my design parameters for a pretty long time. When this small clawfoot became available, I could see that it would fit the design parameters well, just be a pain to install and contain the water from the shower. I had been considering a 5' cast iron alcove with a low ledge down the outside wall to add the width for a 3' wide shower. Huesmann (previous post) pointed out a small cast iron alcove that looks more appealing. Other threads on clawfoot tubs (and other "luxurious" soaking tubs) express many concerns that I think I can minimize with the way I'm considering installing this one. A lot of effort to do the install, but if done well, its done, and have a "just right" bathing space. (not overly spacious, but enough space; not extravagantly expensive, but not focused on cheap; use same space to soak and shower...)



This post gets more into the design parameters I'm considering. Again, I'm a healthy home builder - I know its very important that I address water containment (which is often not done so well even in typical installs...) Hopefully this tread can be used by others down the road. Obviously (by my disclosing some of my design parameters) I'm not looking for "get er done", fastest and easiest, what everyone else is doing, nor am I looking for extravagant $2000+ bathtub fixture. I have skills and experience with attention to details. There are some good comments coming in here, hope they keep coming. And I'm still looking for those "out of the box" ideas to assist with this very unusual install...



I really like the depth of this tub - a true soaking tub. The overflow drain is already pretty high, but I've searched hard and found a vintage low profile fill spout that will mount there and could allow tub to fill to the rim if desired (not necessary) - still taking comparably very little water to fill tub - especially with my body displacing a large volume of water. (side note on this spout - it comes with issues that need to be addressed -an overflow floor drain and backsiphoning protection w/ a vacuum break in the fill line above the food plane of the tub.)



I didn't quite follow the placement in the footprint comment. If its about distributing the load to the structure, any tub full of water with a 200# man in it is a load, but spread that load out over 15SF on an outside wall. Spans are short in a 12 x 12 footprint. And this tub takes very little water to fill, so major weight reduction when in use. If the placement if footprint comment is about supporting the weight of tub w/ tub deck, the tub will be supported from the bottom. And I'll try to rely on positive drainage and not caulk.



Movable building: Yes, weight is a concern, but not the only concern. I'm willing to sacrifice some weight for a comfortable bathing experience. Its a primary purpose of this building. The building is not intended to be moved very often - not like a tiny house on wheels (which actually don't tend to get moved very often anyway.) House movers move entire houses down the street, as well as modular movers... (I'll still have some attention on keeping the weight down in other places.) This tub is probably about 250# empty. And hence my thought of making the shower pan / deck out of stainless or bronze - with a tub shaped lip turned up (welded curve) so that the tub lip drained into the pan when showering. Still a tricky pan to produce with slopes to drain(s). Have also considered a custom fiberglass epoxy pan. Not excited about the smell of the plastic, and same cleaning issue as acrylic tub (below)



A desirably designed acrylic tub would be nice for empty weight concerns, but I'm not seeing anything out there to start with. I'm not real keen on the cleanability of acrylic. I've got a friend who cleans other people's houses, and she just put a cast iron alcove tub in her new house for this reason (I already had wanted cast iron for this reason.) Cast iron is practically bullet proof. (This tub is almost 100 years old and still going strong...) Back to chemical sensitivities: I don't use most cleaning products - mostly scrubbing, and acrylic/ fiberglass gets damaged. Enameled steel is lighter, but easier to damage (dropping things) than cast iron.



I'm wanting a "comfortable" soaking experience (not necessarily luxurious spaciousness), and a "comfortable" shower. An appeal to the claw foot is where it can be placed in the bathing space relative to the shower door and outside side wall. In a 3 ft wide shower/ bath, for when soaking in the tub, I can position the 26" tub so that there is a ledge on both sides to lay my arms when I'm kicked back in a hot bath soaking my aching back. (reading? wine?) I'm 54 and do construction work - spent 3 hrs yesterday hand splitting firewood. Hot baths (and yoga) go a long way towards keeping me functional. Add a tub level window (all aluminum w/ thermal break for shower reasons) and a private garden outside the building and I'm almost soaking outdoors... Most tubs don't afford any ledge on the entry side if there is a shower door there. This shower door will be "the door" to the bathing space. (Closed when in tub). And I can't stand vinyl curtains anyway - stinking plastic as well as moldy shower curtain cleaning issues (maybe that's just me - others may find curtains perfectly acceptable and not worth the expense of shower door.) Particularly thinking this shower door location is why the alcove tub design is not a perfect fit (and fill depth/ of tub). It would be nice if there were an "undermount" small tub design out there - rectangular tub with tile lip (alcove style) on all sides. The "crawl space" beneath the tub can be heated - tub likely being the "radiant heater" for the entire structure, and keep the hot bath hot when I'm in it (and at the very least not sucking the heat out of the water when its initially filled.)
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top