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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
To run a 220v line for a compressor out of the box what type of wire should i use i have a roll of 12/2 romax 600v the yellow is this ok to use or NO.The compressor calls for a 15amp breaker the double i have that
 

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If it calls for 15 amp breaker then 14ga is all that is required, but 12ga will never hurt. I probably would use 12ga anyway just incase you ever get a little bigger compressor.
 

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To run a 220v line for a compressor out of the box what type of wire should i use i have a roll of 12/2 romax 600v the yellow is this ok to use or NO.The compressor calls for a 15amp breaker the double i have that
12-2 will work fine for a 15A load, assuming this is straight 240V, not 120/240 like a dryer. If it's straight 240V be sure to mark the white as 'hot' with a piece of black electrical tape at the panel and at the device receptacle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
12-2 will work fine for a 15A load, assuming this is straight 240V, not 120/240 like a dryer. If it's straight 240V be sure to mark the white as 'hot' with a piece of black electrical tape at the panel and at the device receptacle.
i have a double pole breaker i'm useing it takes up to 120 slots in the box when you say not like a dryer would it have to be done different if it's like a dryer type
 

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i have a double pole breaker i'm useing it takes up to 120 slots in the box when you say not like a dryer would it have to be done different if it's like a dryer type
A dryer uses 120V for some things (everything, actually except the heating element). The heating element uses 240. So, since you have 120 and 240 in the same appliance the circuit has to have (in the case of a dryer) 10-3. Two hots (black and red), a neutral and a ground. A straight 240 only needs two hot wires, no neutral and a ground. Since 12-2 is made anticipating a hot and neutral will be used, you have a black and white wire. You can use the white as hot (for straight 240V, 20A or less) but you have to put black electrical tape at the panel and at the appliance box on the white wire. This indicates it is used as a hot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
A dryer uses 120V for some things (everything, actually except the heating element). The heating element uses 240. So, since you have 120 and 240 in the same appliance the circuit has to have (in the case of a dryer) 10-3. Two hots (black and red), a neutral and a ground. A straight 240 only needs two hot wires, no neutral and a ground. Since 12-2 is made anticipating a hot and neutral will be used, you have a black and white wire. You can use the white as hot (for straight 240V, 20A or less) but you have to put black electrical tape at the panel and at the appliance box on the white wire. This indicates it is used as a hot.
ok so when i pop in the breaker the white wire i just put black electrical tape on white wire both ends it's a siemens 2 pole breaker with the two screws.I must of been looking at this wrong i thought black wire went in one side of the breaker and the white in the other side making them both hot
 

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12/2 both sides just mark the white wire, blk or red indicating it is a hot wire. i would stick with 12/2 do not forget to account for voltage drop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
12/2 both sides just mark the white wire, blk or red indicating it is a hot wire. i would stick with 12/2 do not forget to account for voltage drop.
ok after black in one side of breaker white in the other and ground to where the others are grounded and tape white wire on both ends.
 

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ok after black in one side of breaker white in the other and ground to where the others are grounded and tape white wire on both ends.
Yes, that's it.
 
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