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Discussion Starter #1
I installed a new stainless steel sink drain in my mother-in-laws house yesterday and made the mistake of using silicone on the flange instead of plumber's putty. The more and more I read, this is a no-no.

There is no leak, seems to be fine so the question is do I remove the silicone and do it over using plumber's putty? I understand silicone is extremely difficult to get off. Will the silicone possibly be ok if I leave it? Or will it be leaking in 6 months and I'll have to change it anyway?

Thanks for your responses...
 

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I dont know where you're getting that its a no no to use silicone on a basket strainer (sink drain). You ARE talking about the part that attaches to the sink itself, right? If so then you're fine. In fact, most solid surface countertops with integral sinks (such as Corian) require silicone on basket strainers and garbage disposal assemblies. This is because the oils in plumbers putty can discolor the material. This isnt an issue with a stainless steel sink, but even with that you're fine with silicone.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Plumber's putty vs. Silicone

Yes, the strainer assembly that attaches directly to the sink. I guess I've just been reading that plumber's putty is the preferred choice. Just saw threads here and there where some people despise using silicone on the flange.

Just read that it's not as good as plumber's putty and won't last. Just trying to save myself some time later down the road if I'm going to have to replace it with putty anyway.
 

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anyone who tells you to use plumbers putty over 100% silicone is a complete idiot. most of my service calls in the kitchen sink is because of putty. it is a sure bet if plumbers putty was used on a garbage disposal it is only a matter of time before the vibrations break the seal and the sink leaks. people who don't use silicone probably never have and have no clue how it blows putty away. these folks probably think cast iron is better than pvc and galvanized pipe is better than pex. and this stuff about silicone having chemicals in it that will damage certain fixtures is bull. it might after 65 years. the only thing that is important is the clean up which must be done right after application since it "skins over" in less than five minutes. i take a rag and cut it into four parts. wet three pieces good and squeeze all the water you can out. once you apply whatever you are connecting, immediately take one rag and wipe up the excess being careful not to spread it any more than it already is. clean up a little better with the second rag. now finish up with the third one. use more if necessary. use more if necessary and then wipe clean with the dry rag. it can be removed and scraped off with a knife. this takes a little longer since you have a 500% better seal. people who pick putty over silicone are still watching black and white tv's. period. thanks, bb
 

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when i spoke of removal with a knife i was not talking about on something new. if you take an old unit apart you can clean up with a knife but be careful not to scratch a finish surface. sorry about going off on putty people but it isn't even close what the two do. bb
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks buddy, I never realized why so many people prefer putty over silicone. Yes, it's more of a pain to clean up but that's the only drawback I've seen. Well I won't be taking the drain apart again, that's a relief.

I'm also installing a new kitchen faucet, I would use silicone to adhere the faucet base to the sink, right?

Should I use teflon paste/tape anywhere on the compression nuts? I saw something where people use teflon paste on the connection for the sprayer, is this needed? Thanks again....
 

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anyone who tells you to use plumbers putty over 100% silicone is a complete idiot....
Well then label me an idiot. But that's ok; I don't know you, you don't know me, so it really doesn' matter does it?

When it comes time to replace the drain basket, garbage disposer what ever, I'd much rather remove putty than having a boat load of sillycone to dig out. Call me what you want...but I'll NEVER (unless directed by the mfg instructions) use anything other than putty, tried and true and when installed properly, it'll last the life of the fixture.
 
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