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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, This might be a dumb question, but I haven't been able to satisfactorily answer it on my own. Would it be permissible to install this unit on a wall inside the shower enclosure: Panasonic FV-0510VSL1 WhisperValue DC Ventilation Fan/Light with Pick-A-Flow Speed Selector, Low Profile, Extremely Quiet, Long Lasting, Easy to Install, Code Compliant, Energy Star Certified, White https://www.amazon.com/dp/B075ZBF9HG/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_Gy-nEbVHW5NZ6

The manufacturer states that it may be installed "above a shower" , provided that it is GFIC protected, and also that it may be installed "in a wall". May I safely assume that I can install this unit, on it's own 20amp GFCI circuit, on the wall opposite the shower head, just below the ceiling?
 

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· Naildriver
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Unless you pre planned for the switching of a heated unit, you would have to add wiring for that down the road. I doubt you would ever see a heated unit INSIDE a shower. I would prefer heat outside the confines of the shower, not while showering.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the input, folks! It appears to me that the NEC requires two circuits for a bathroom. One AFCI / GFCI circuit for receptacles, and one circuit for lights. It states that "the fan may be wired into the light circuit".

Ok, so I interpret this such that I will need two AFCI / GFCI circuits. One for receptacles, and one for fan and lights. Because my fan contains a "light", I don't want to get dinged for not putting all lights and all receptacles on separate circuits. Because the fan will be IN the shower, it must have AFCI / GFCI protection. Hence, two circuits, both protected. Am I correct? Text Font Document
 

· Naildriver
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The Spruce is going on the assumption that you are powering more than one bathroom on those circuits. A 1999 exception was issued to allow both receptacle(s) and lighting in a single bathroom to emanate from one 20 amp circuit, and wired accordingly.

Let's wait on others since 1999 was some time ago and other exceptions or revisions would either enhance or negate that ruling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The Spruce is going on the assumption that you are powering more than one bathroom on those circuits. A 1999 exception was issued to allow both receptacle(s) and lighting in a single bathroom to emanate from one 20 amp circuit, and wired accordingly.

Let's wait on others since 1999 was some time ago and other exceptions or revisions would either enhance or negate that ruling.
Thanks, Chandler. I don't mind installing two circuits. I've plenty of spots left in the service panel. My main concern with this topic was that my chosen fan / light combo could be installed high on a shower wall. I think I will go ahead and purchase it, and both of the AFCI / GFCI combo breakers. Another bathroom, and the kitchen, need receptacles updated to GFCI anyways. So it will never go to waste if not used for the upper bath. ☺
 

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IMO the only reason to install a fan/light on the wall would be if you're unable to access the ceiling to run your vent pipe. The unit you've selected does appear to permit wall mounting, though IDK where you'll get a 4" oval elbow.
 

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I would agree. There is no way I would wall mount a fan especially in a shower. Moving moist air is one thing, lifting it is a whole different story. Regarding duct work,going right into an elbow significantly reduces the air flow. 1 elbow is the same resistance as 5 ft. of straight duct.
 

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Agree on both the issue of fitting the duct into the wall cavity and the elbow restriction. I would not do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Just adding fuel to the fire, I only found one direct wall vent fan when looking, but, it would require an outside matching plate or you could see right through it.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Panason...haust-Bath-Fan-ENERGY-STAR-FV-08WQ1/203762110
Chandler, to look thru that vent, a person would have to climb over the fence, and then either have a ladder, or be like 11 feet tall! It would be much easier to just look in the window (which I will probably replace with glass block or frosted, once it's no longer needed by code.) 😁
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thank you everyone for the help and advice. To clarify a couple of things, I'm NOT cutting a hole in the roof for this vent! There's a foot of snow and ice up there that probably won't melt until May! From what I've read, in my extreme winter climate it's more advised to vent laterally. Vertical venting can cause a chimney effect, sucking warm air out the room 24/7. It also often results in condensed water dripping back through the fan. A soffitt vent would likely end up a frozen mass of ice by this time every winter. It's a hip roof, so no gable ends to go through the attic. That would be a really long run, anyway. From what I've read, my best option *in this climate* is to go out through the bathroom wall. Interior humidity isn't really a problem here in the winter. I just looked, and the house is at 25 percent right now. So it won't take much to de-steam a small bathroom. In the warm months, we can just let the fan run longer if needed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Actually it does not require 2 seperate circuits for the bathroom. It requires a 20 amp dedicated circuit for the GFI. The lighting circuit can come from anywhere.Bathroom lights etc can be on the bedroom circuit or any convenient circuit.
Oldmaster, so are you saying that the fan / light unit could go on the receptacle circuit? Because being in the shower, it requires GFCI.
 

· Naildriver
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Why must the fan be IN the shower? Can it not be in the wall outside the shower? Air will move to the fan naturally and evacuate the entire bathroom. If humidity is not a problem, locating the fan directly in the shower is not an answer.

You can mount ANY of the wall/roof exit fans in the wall, it is just you have to vent from the side of the fan to the outside, which would mean cutting a hole above the fan for the exhaust pipe to run (preferably in the same stud bay)
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Why must the fan be IN the shower? Can it not be in the wall outside the shower? Air will move to the fan naturally and evacuate the entire bathroom. If humidity is not a problem, locating the fan directly in the shower is not an answer.

You can mount ANY of the wall/roof exit fans in the wall, it is just you have to vent from the side of the fan to the outside, which would mean cutting a hole above the fan for the exhaust pipe to run (preferably in the same stud bay)
This is the exterior wall that I have to work with. Going above the window forces me to vent into the soffit. Plus I wanted to add light to the shower. I suppose I could always put a plain fan somewhere below the window, and add a separate shower light.
 

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