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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi
I want to install IKEA base cabinets against a wall. Length of cabinets will be 96" (15"+24"+18"+24"+18")
But the wall is not flat.....it's OK on the right side on 55", but then the wall goes off, and I will have a 3/4" gap at the other end !!!
Is there a solution other than redoing the wall???
 

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This is just going to be a lot harder and not look right unless you take the time to redo that wall.
 

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Jello Wrangler
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You need to split the difference and go 3/8" of the wall on either side or find the deviation and fix it.

It could be the entire wall takes the angle or just a stud that was not crowned the right way.
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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If the IKEA cabinets use the hanging rail, I would just shim it out flat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
OK, if my straight edge is straight (and I think it is....:smile:), the gap on the left is 1/2" actually (the length of the straight edge is 8', which is the length of the cabinet row)
So with a 1/2" gap, I could shim to split that gap and have 1/4" on each end. Then a backsplash should hide the gap....Is this something acceptable?
What do you think?
Thanks
 

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Jello Wrangler
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Have you ever seen pro cabinet installers open a wall? Nope.
No, but we are not talking about a finished carpenter either.

But since you want to opened the door, as a GC who specializes in kitchen and bathroom remodels that's exactly what we would do.

We would open the wall and fix the stud. It's the cheapest easiest fix. The only finished repair needed would be between the upper and lower cabinets of you weren't tiling.

The HO is playing all of the parts in this remodel he would put his rough carpenter hat on and demo the DW, fix the stud. Then he would put his DW hat on and install the piece, tape and mud. Then put his finish carpenter hat on and hang the cabinets.
 

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@OP - sounds like you have seen may cabinets installed without the counter top on. You would be amazed at what some installers do to get the cabinets mounted. Our 1983 kitchen had all sorts of shims so the cabinets would fit, and who would know until I demoed the kitchen year before last.

I wound up doing almost the same thing. Then the counter top guy came along and made his template for the Silstone top and wall was good with the world! :)

So, add shims where needed so the wall appears straight for the base cabinets to sit against. Run in a few screws , and move on.

Good luck.
 

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Jello Wrangler
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@OP - sounds like you have seen may cabinets installed without the counter top on. You would be amazed at what some installers do to get the cabinets mounted. Our 1983 kitchen had all sorts of shims so the cabinets would fit, and who would know until I demoed the kitchen year before last.

I wound up doing almost the same thing. Then the counter top guy came along and made his template for the Silstone top and wall was good with the world! :)

So, add shims where needed so the wall appears straight for the base cabinets to sit against. Run in a few screws , and move on.

Good luck.
What about the backsplash? If it's a 4" granite or top material splash would you also recommend that he just caulk it? If the uses tile he'll have even more troubles.

The best course is to fix the problem. No shimming and no worries on the backsplash.

Just because it was done before, doesn't mean that it was the right way or the best way to do it. Most builders are lazy and don't care about details like this. They would rather shim and put ugly trim on the wall transitions.
 

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Property Mgt/Maint
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OK, if my straight edge is straight (and I think it is....:smile:), the gap on the left is 1/2" actually (the length of the straight edge is 8', which is the length of the cabinet row)
So with a 1/2" gap, I could shim to split that gap and have 1/4" on each end. Then a backsplash should hide the gap....Is this something acceptable?
What do you think?
Thanks

1/4" gap isn't getting me too excited in a garage. What are you using for a top and splash if any?
 

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I've dealt with this same problem.

Shimmed the cabinets and then when the countertop with a granite backsplash was installed, we cut the sheetrock so the backsplash had a slightly lesser reveal across the length.

No way you can tell unless you stick you head up under the wall cabinets and make a seriously painful effort to look down the line.

I quickly realized there pretty much was no way to open up the wall in a wild attempt to get that 1/2" or so in several places.
 

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Jello Wrangler
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I've dealt with this same problem.

Shimmed the cabinets and then when the countertop with a granite backsplash was installed, we cut the sheetrock so the backsplash had a slightly lesser reveal across the length.

No way you can tell unless you stick you head up under the wall cabinets and make a seriously painful effort to look down the line.

I quickly realized there pretty much was no way to open up the wall in a wild attempt to get that 1/2" or so in several places.
He said it 3/4" out. Splashes are typically 1 1/4" - 1 1/2" thick. Which means you will definitely will see the drywall overlapping the splash without shooting the wall. It also means no tile on the backsplash either. It's hackery to cut the drywall and shove the splash in the wall. I would hate to collect money from a client half as$ing work like that.

Also, how was there no way to open the wall and plane it. I guess when you don't know what you are doing it could seem impossible, but it's rather easy.

They sell drywall shims just for this purpose. You also pull out your planer and plane out the ones that are sticking into the room. It's really not that hard. Cut out the drywall, fix the studs and put it back up.
 

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When you cut the countertop/back splash into the drywall as you suggest there are implications. ie: the countertop may not overhang enough to extend past the doors and handles or there will be visible gaps at the ends of the countertops.

Pull the drywall, fix the stud and everything is good. Most of the drywall repair is behind the cabinets and uppers, so the repatch is easy and everything fits well and looks good. Even better would be to tile the wall above the backsplash to the underside of the uppers.
 
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