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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi all,
I have a new S9V2 Trane furnace. The installers re-hooked up my Aprialaire 560 humidifier with outside probe Last spring and never tested I'm guessing. For reference, I have a Honeywell RTH9580WF Wi-Fi Smart Touchscreen Thermostat.

Now the issue. I noticed my water bill was twice what it should be. Upon investigating the issue the water never shuts off.

I run my fan continuously as they were aware of During install but here is the weird part. They are using the stock 24 volt transformer. They are also tieing into the 24 volt B/C tap inside the furnace BUT the other wire is going to the yellow Y1 tap.... So for those thinking it is the fan W tap it would make sense the water would never shut off as I run fan 24/7.

So, I have investigated the HUM terminals and need to point out that these terminals on this furnace are A DRY CONTACT RELAY, not 24 or 110 volts.

Can some HVAC expert out there give me the best way to run under call for heat only? Again , why are they using the transformer and the 24 volt BC Tap? I’m guessing the Y1 connection was a plain mistake.

I would call them back out but it would be a pain knowing them now as I do. I do have basic knowledge concerning circuits so just as easy to rewire myself.

Thanks in advance!
 

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All you need is to hook the dry HUM switched contacts in series with 24 vac and over to the humidifier and humidistat .. all one big series circuit. It'll come on when the HUM switch closes, which is when the heat come on. You don't need any direct thermostat connection, so remove any wire that may be doing that now.

You can use the 24 vac that is built in to the furnace or supply another one... often they come with the humidifier. Either way is OK.
 

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I haven't hear of an AprilAire 560 humidifier so double check that and see if the model numbers is something like 500, 600, 700 or the likes. I think 560 is a filter pad replacement number.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
OK, MY BAD. After Cutting the wire zip tie off the bundle the Y1 and C wire go out to the compressor. Same wire type. Outdoor humidity sensor wire hidden. You know what happens we we assume!

So, now the question is, on the 560. 2 wires go to the 24 ac, 2 wires go to the outdoor sensor and 2 wires go to the solenoid.

So i guess i would just interrupt the solinoid or 24volt with the HUM (Dry contact) And move on? HUM only activates on call for heat. (Thanks to Surferdude 2)

Question is....how does it know the fan is running. No line running other than what i mentioned. Nothing running anywhere else? Again old model 560 Which shows wiring a current sensor down to motor.

Thanks and sorry for the confusion.
 

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Question is....how does it know the fan is running. No line running other than what i mentioned. Nothing running anywhere else?
When the control board energizes the gas valve (or on some models, as soon as heat is called) it also closes the dry contact switch for the humidifier. Otherwise, those contacts never close.

You don't need that current sensor except on furnaces that have no HUM provision on the control board (old units).

You didn't mention the indoor humidity sensor (humidistat)... it has to be in the loop somewhere. That outside sensor is for temperature. Perhaps it's already prewired into the loop in that model... I have no schematic.

According to AprilAire, "For every 1°change in outdoor temperature, the control will automatically adjust the indoor relative humidity (RH) by 1/2%." That's where the outdoor sensor come into the act.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hi all,
Thanks to all your input it has been Rewired and is functioning correctly! Also found the temp bulb outside up under the insulation board and new siding. Doubt it was registering outside temp as it should have been.
Thanks again!
Don
 

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Why would you need an outside temp or humidity sensor for a device that humidifies indoor air?
Just asking'.
 

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Why would you need an outside temp or humidity sensor for a device that humidifies indoor air?
Just asking'.
°
According to AprilAire, "For every 1°change in outdoor temperature, the control will automatically adjust the indoor relative humidity (RH) by 1/2%." That's where the outdoor sensor come into the act.

That keeps the windows from dew pointing when it gets very cold.
 

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Interesting logic on their part.....lower the humidity when you need it the most.:vs_laugh:
°
It is an option for that reason. There are some folks who consider the sweating of the widow panes indicative of the possibility that hidden areas in outside wall may also be sweating and giving rise to mold formation. Then there are folks like me who would rather have the comfort of the humidity and let the mold worry about itself. I'll control it manually, thank you all the same AprilAire.

Big companies have to respond to every squawk they hear from their customers so they try to offer options (usually over priced) to answer ever possibility so that you'll have to pay up or shut up.
 

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It's not unlike the "energy star" appliances.
They work very poorly on those settings but the government says they have to provide it.
 

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Yep, we put a lot of big a/c on restaurants with the required "Economizers" that immediately got disabled by their maintenance man soon after we did our start-up and set the enthalpy control properly. Big waste of equipment, time and money but I still smiled all the way to the bank.
 

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Interesting logic on their part.....lower the humidity when you need it the most.:vs_laugh:
Its to prevent condensate on the widows of homes with lower quality windows.
 

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Its to prevent condensate on the widows of homes with lower quality windows.
Oh, I know what it is for.
Just saying it's counterproductive to have a humidifier restrict it's output to keep condensation down when it's sole purpose is to increase humidity.
I grew up in a home with poor insulation and poor windows. Very often they would have ice on them in the winter. A towel on the window sill took care of it.
 

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Oh, I know what it is for.
Just saying it's counterproductive to have a humidifier restrict it's output to keep condensation down when it's sole purpose is to increase humidity.
I grew up in a home with poor insulation and poor windows. Very often they would have ice on them in the winter. A towel on the window sill took care of it.
No it's not - either it has to be done manually or automatically.

40% humidity at 0F is a great way to ruin a house.

I think the automatic control is unnecessary and adds to costs - it takes two seconds to reduce it manually.
 

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I think the automatic control is unnecessary and adds to costs - it takes two seconds to reduce it manually.

Of course, to do that right. You have to keep on adjusting it every few hours, or so.


The automatic control lets you set it and forget it. So a home owner can enjoy their comfort, without having to keep on thinking about it.
 
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