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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Need some ideas about filling those gaps (the ones stuffed with white shopping bags right now) as these are leaking cold air into the room (1st pic). And caulk/seal rest of the joint (2nd pic).

I can do backer rods and then a polyurethane based concrete sealant/foam for those gaps and use the same sealant for the 2nd part. Its pretty cold right now but temps will be above 40 next week and the sealants I'm looking at (Sika ones) can work above 40F.

Is this is a good idea or should I get a pro to get this fixed? If this can be done without a pro then what kind of sealant/materials should I get?

I'm thinking something like: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Rapid-Set-10-1-fl-oz-Rapid-Set-Non-Sag-Sealant-White-196330010/301015720 or https://www.homedepot.com/p/Sikaflex-10-1-fl-oz-Construction-Sealant-White-7116045/300934496

Backer rod: https://www.homedepot.com/p/M-D-Bui...acker-Rod-for-Gaps-and-Joints-71506/100165680

Note:

  • The water leak in 2nd pic was from a neighbor and has been fixed. I'll be replacing the baseboards soon.
  • I stuffed with shopping bags to slow down the air leak and since most sealants cannot be applied at freezing temps.
  • The temps in the crack (measured with a laser thermometer shows around 44F. The outside temp right now is 14F (real feel -4F)
 

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Yeah it would. Although I can use this one: http://www.dap.com/dap-products-ph/daptex-plus-multi-purpose-foam-sealant/ which doesn't overexpand and is softer, so bit easier to score/trim.
I've used that stuff and cannot easily recommend it. It is about the consistency of cool whip and stays wet if it is applied too thick. The low expansion "windows and doors" formulation of great stuff has a much better reputation in my book.

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Isn't that just normal wear and tear? This house is at least 30 years old. Joints usually develop cracks over time, don't they?
It's hard to say from the pics but gaps that wide are usually a good indicator of some other issues, like improper water management causing settling to occur.

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The low expansion "windows and doors" formulation of great stuff has a much better reputation in my book.
Any specific products you have in mind? Like this yellow foam: https://www.homedepot.com/p/GREAT-S...lant-with-Quick-Stop-Straw-99053990/206983874

It's hard to say from the pics but gaps that wide are usually a good indicator of some other issues, like improper water management causing settling to occur.
There are no pipes under the floor, nor any sewage lines. So I'm not sure if its due to any water management. I've had similar cracks in my garage floor too which I filled in using the polyurethane sealant. Does anything else come to mind?

Explain please, water from neighbor, shared wall?
Is this basement?
Attached townhouses, and the water leak happened where the neighbors powder room is. The water flowed on to my side. There are no basements.

Here's a rough sketch of the layout.
 

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Any specific products you have in mind? Like this yellow foam: https://www.homedepot.com/p/GREAT-S...lant-with-Quick-Stop-Straw-99053990/206983874



There are no pipes under the floor, nor any sewage lines. So I'm not sure if its due to any water management. I've had similar cracks in my garage floor too which I filled in using the polyurethane sealant. Does anything else come to mind?



Attached townhouses, and the water leak happened where the neighbors powder room is. The water flowed on to my side. There are no basements.

Here's a rough sketch of the layout.
Yep, that's the product exactly. Don't fill the crack to the top as the foam still expands about 30%.
The water management I was referring to was exterior--rain water. Clogged gutters and downspouts that cause water to fall at the foundation and improperly graded earth are leading culprits in foundation settling and crack development.

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
How about this one: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Loctite...IPHorizontal2_rr-_-206983874-_-302135916-_-N? I've used it in past. Plus the color would match the floor color which is kinda white.

Rain water, snow cannot reach this directly as it is quite well shielded (by the front porch). No gutters or downspouts either. But yeah, anything underground may be a suspect.

Its roughly 0.5 - 0.7 inches wide at its widest point (the shopping bags make it look wider as they overflow from being overstuffed) and are probably 1 inch deep. I checked with my neighbors who have lived here longer and they seem to find it normal wear and tear. Do you think I need to get it check from some professionals? Foundation experts maybe?
 

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but normal wear & tear usually doesn't produce dislodged sole plates im-n-s-h-fo,,, i'd remove some drywall to look at wall's sole & top plate,,, our home's 40yrs old - nothing like that, tho
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
With a bit warmer temps, I took out the shopping bags and took a second look at it.

It seems that they used styrofoam as a cushion (expansion joint) between the slab and the foundation walls. And then topped with off with concrete. At places the foam has worn off - probably due to air/water seeping in through the front siding/walls.



 

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With a bit warmer temps, I took out the shopping bags and took a second look at it.

It seems that they used styrofoam as a cushion (expansion joint) between the slab and the foundation walls. And then topped with off with concrete. At places the foam has worn off - probably due to air/water seeping in through the front siding/walls.



This makes more sense than a gap that size just opening up out of nowhere without water issues or settling. The missing Styrofoam can likely be attributed to rodents using it for nesting. Fill it back with spray foam and you'll be set

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'styrofoam' =/aka 'sill seal' ???,,, neal's likely more knowledgeable on this item but isn't sill normal under btm plates ???
You're thinking of the thin aerated foam that seals between the foundation/slab and the sill plate. The foam is also known as a capillary break as it keeps water from the concrete from wicking into the wood framing.
In the above pics is a layer of material that runs the perimeter of the slab to seal the slab against the foundation and allow it to expand and contract with temperature and humidity without causing damage to itself or the foundation.

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This was one of those better ideas a few years ago where uses foam board to insulate the outside perimeter the foam could be on the flat under the edge of the slab or stand it up next to the foundation causing all kinds of problems.
There are product that are for filling gaps in concrete. Not sure about the one posted but I think you have the right idea.
 
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