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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would need some advice and tips please.
I have a kitchen table, which does not really fit in our kitchen, so I was thinking about moving it out to our deck. I would like to treat it with something, a paint or a lacquer or something, to protect from the rain and weather. It is currently stained, pretty shiny, but I do not really want to strip it, as the original stain looks pretty good. My question is, can I paint over the stain somehow (after sanding?) What kind of paint you suggest? I was at HD yesterday, looking for something, all I found was some spray-paints (but with them am afraid it will be ugly), and some transparent stuff (although I am leaning towards making it slightly darker if possible). Any ideas what I should look for/buy?


thanks!!
 

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If all parts of the table are solid wood and any hardware is brass, aluminum, or stainless steel, you can sand it, apply at least six coats of GOOD Marine varnish (you won't find any at HD) to every surface, and hope for the best. And I do mean EVERY surface, it has to be completely sealed to stand a chance against the elements. Also be prepared to add a couple more coats of varnish at least once a year, depending on your climate.
If any part is veneered MDF or particleboard, and hardware is cheap stamped steel, don't waste your time.:no:
BTW, for the cost of the quality varnish you'll need you can probably buy a halfway decent set of deck furniture.
 

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Wood cabinet furniture indeed is susceptible to stain and wear and tear especially if it placed outside. You situation is quite complicated are you do not want to sand or paint the overall surface of the table.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks!

well, i dont need it to last forever:), i just dont want it to get completely ruined in 6-8 months. And i am ok to re-paint it every or every second year. It s a solid wood table, it has one drawer, and I plan to sand and paint it all over, not only the top surface.

where can i buy marine varnish then? and is it that expensive?
 

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I had this same situation a number of years ago...a plywood table from my student days. I put a couple coats of melamine paint all over, and stuck it outside on my deck. We used it for years, until we bought something nicer. I brought it inside in the winter months. I'd say we got 6 or 7 years out of it, and it didn't weather or get ruined.
 

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zitad, my recommendation for varnish was to preserve the natural wood look, but if you want to go with an opaque finish you'll be best served by a good marine topside paint. Melamine might work for you, but it's not the easiest stuff to work with. Marine paint will definitely do the job, it's easier to apply, and might even be little cheaper. Interlux Brightside one part poly would be a good choice. You can find marine paints and varnishes at any boat supply shop. :thumbsup:
 

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Some sort of marine finish, or perhaps a poly of some sort is your only hope as mentioned but every joint and the wood itself in that interior table is going to scream to the point it keeps you up at night with the outdoor temperature and humidity changes. And is mentioned, the fasteners holding it together better up to six months of weather or you should replace them with brass or stainless.

I guess in Northern California I might have gotten one to last 6-8 months if the fog promised to never roll in. Where I lived, there could be a 40 degree temp difference between day and night temps outside though.

Here in the Midwest? Humidity has not risen much yet and it has taken awhile for the temp to do so. Both will end up matching each other at 100 in a couple of months. Clients with grand pianos will be really annoyed they are wait listed as the things swell. And I will get numerous calls to come fix antique doors that stick. I scrape an old candle stick around the frame, charge them a few grand, and hope for the best. (Just kidding).

And then, by fall the humidity, and then the temp will sink again until the dry off winter when you can electrocute yourself building up static electricity. And again, clients with pianos will wait in line for tuning. And clients with antique doors call me to come and cram a candle stick in between the doors and the frames.

Indoor furniture takes a real beating here and if it not of quality does not look well after a time. I cannot imagine expecting more than a year out of even a nice indoor table I committed to outdoor use here. And especially not if I dreamed I could drag it back in when winter came.

Why not just unload it on Craig's List or eBay and get a nice outdoor table. Something built for the purpose?
 
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