DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all! glad to be here.... gonna be doing quite some plumbing work with a handyman of mine to lower cost of my new business so I hope this is the right place to get some good pro info!

So with my new biz, they are requiring a 3 basin sink like a restaurant kitchen, and with this they require an indirect plumbing for the drain of this sink. And the "official" doc states:

"Unless approved by the local plumbing authority, all warewashing sinks, culinary (prep) sinks,
ice machines, and commercial dish machines must be indirectly plumbed to a sewage outlet
pipe by either an air gap or air break."

Here is an image in our doc that shows an example and another photo the state office sent me as real life examples:





This is my dilemma... in my new space, the only thing that has any water access is the bathroom, which is hear the room where I want the 3 basin sink, just across a 3 foot space in the hall.

Initially I was planning on just drilling holes through the wall and connecting a pipe directly from the 3-sink to the bathroom pipes to flow into and drain out using a mini-water pump and adding a portable tankless water heater.

But a licensed plumber told me, and another agreed, that if we need that indirect drain, that is impossible, that we need to basically smash into and dig out the concrete floor, and run pipes into the ground and into the sewage line.

This will clearly cost me a TON more than my first option. In fact, quotes were like $3k - $5k ! (depending on any adversity with the concrete and pies underground)

So as the statement in the doc states:

"Unless approved by the local plumbing authority..."

can I use this to work around this? Example:

I find a plumber who can make this work WITH an indirect drain as shown, and use some contraption/setup that doesnt require us to tear up all the hard concrete and still get the job done, AND have a "local plumbing authority" approve it, thus, showing the city and Dept of Agriculture inspector that this is legit and will work the same safely?

Also I do not even know what a "local plumbing authority" is... I been asking my city hall office in charge of permits/inspecting and they have no idea either, so how do I find this "local plumbing authority"?

And I am open to ALL out of the box thinking here... This is a LEASED space and I really rather not be tearing up concrete to get this done, spending so much, since I already have to spend thousands on other parts of the space, it'll just get to be too much, even though at the end of the day, I am fully vested already in this and too late to turn back really.

Thank you!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,452 Posts
I guess I'll be the 3rd plumber to tell you- Any commercial fixture dealing with food prep must be indirectly connected. I don't know an inspector that would allow otherwise.
you should run these sinks indirectly to a floor sink (underslab). Your air gap would be located there. Also, you may be needing a grease trap. Your plumbing inspector would know this...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I guess I'll be the 3rd plumber to tell you- Any commercial fixture dealing with food prep must be indirectly connected. I don't know an inspector that would allow otherwise.
you should run these sinks indirectly to a floor sink (underslab). Your air gap would be located there. Also, you may be needing a grease trap. Your plumbing inspector would know this...
My question wasnt whether I need the air gap, the FDACS already told me that and I am not trying to not do that, it was busting into the concrete that was the whole point of my query.

AFA the floor sink, my question again would be is there a way to keep that drainage above ground in some way so again I dont have to tear down into the concrete.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,452 Posts
My question wasnt whether I need the air gap, the FDACS already told me that and I am not trying to not do that, it was busting into the concrete that was the whole point of my query.

AFA the floor sink, my question again would be is there a way to keep that drainage above ground in some way so again I dont have to tear down into the concrete.
I was simply agreeing with the 2 plumbers you brought in. I assume they walked the site and observed your conditions. Finding another method is going to require a conversation with your AHJ.

You mentioned a pump. Pumps add another dimension to code requirements- now your adding a pressure discharge line to a gravity system and pipes must be sized accordingly. You also need a sump to receive the sink discharge and a vent on the sump. Do you have proper pipe sizes and space? Do you have proper electricity to power a pump?
Sorry to say but, I still agree with the 2 plumbers. Maybe try this route- buy your plumbing permit, get your inspector in there, lay out your plan to him and see what he says.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,012 Posts
Would not a non-indirect drain of that size require the same breaking up of the concrete floor as your proposed indirect drain would?

Home dishwashers (and washing machines) have always required indirect drains (accomplished by a drain hose fitting loosely into the drain standpipe or piped into a nearby sink or disposer prior to the trap).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,501 Posts
In the state of Ohio any commercial plumbing requires permits and inspections and licensed plumbers doing the work. Your plumbing authority is the inspector. State or local building department or health department. Also any changes require food service approval.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top