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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I get a buzzing from a lot of different appliances in my house. From lamps (using compact fluorescent bulbs), to guitar amplifiers. The house was built in 1907 and some of the wiring had been redone in (maybe) the 80s or 90s. The house is technically two flats, so there are two Service Panels in the basement. The buzzing is on both floors, so coming from both Service Panels.

From what I can gather:
- The Ground wire running from the Panel 2 (2nd & 3rd floors) consists of a jumper to the Ground/Neutral Bus Bar at Panel 1 (1st floor), then to the Ground Rod outdoors.

- The Jumper Wire from Panel 2 to Panel 1 is stranded wire (maybe 8 gauge).

- The Ground wire going from Panel 1 to the Ground rod is Solid Wire (unsheathed)

- The Ground Rod is not far from the awning of the roof, so excess moisture could also be a factor

- The Neutral/Ground Bus Bar from Panel 2 seems to be slightly corroded/rusty

- There are 3-Prong outlets in the house and most of them do have a ground wire attached

Questions:
1. Is there a way to fix this at the source, or is a total rewiring required?

2. Do I need a separate Ground Rod for Panel 2?

3. Do I need to move the original Ground Rod farther from the house/source of moisture?

The wife and I lost our jobs and have no money, so hiring a professional to even look at it is out of the question. We also don't have the money to rewire the house ourselves, though this is something I am confident I could do myself (with help).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sorry, it's not "up by the awning of the roof." It's the Proper Ground Rod, but it is located in the ground, under the awning of the roof where rain water drips. I understand that excess moisture in the ground could cause interference or improper grounding.
 

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Do you. Have a single bus bar panel 2 to which both neutral and ground wires tie in.....or is there a neutral bus and a separate ground bus?

Ron
 

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Sounds like current on the grounding system. Usually caused by neutral to ground bonds after the main disconnect.

Any pics of the panels in question?
 

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Buzzing on branch circuits comes from loose connections. Not "Objectionable" current.
EMFs cant cancel as well as elevated voltage on the grounding system which can cause hum on audio equipment as well as inference with electronics.

Think of it this way, amp clamp a 2 wire lamp cord with lamp on. The reading tends to be near zero. Do the same with one wire only. Reading near what the lamp is pulling. The reason for that is current cancelation. Same method GFCIs use to detect ground faults.
 

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Truthfully op,
I'm not sure if the objectionable current flow is causing the buzzing.

If the current is flowing across thin metal and loose connections I would think it possible.

I do know though your not supposed to have it "if" that's whats going on.
Possible shock, or fire ( and maybe possible buzzing :) )

If it can be related or not, I have heard the buzzing and rumbles of shorts with conduit systems (which is objectionable current).

Maybe it has nothing to do with it. Just throwing it out there.
(you may want to check the neutrals/grounds in each panel to rule it out)
 

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EMFs cant cancel as well as elevated voltage on the grounding system which can cause hum on audio equipment as well as inference with electronics.

Think of it this way, amp clamp a 2 wire lamp cord with lamp on. The reading tends to be near zero. Do the same with one wire only. Reading near what the lamp is pulling. The reason for that is current cancelation. Same method GFCIs use to detect ground faults.
I really want to know where you are pulling this stuff from.
 
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