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I just bought a DeWalt cordless impact drill I also have a DeWalt cordless regular drill. can I use the impact drill for everything in place of the regular drill? I'd like to give the regular drill to somebody but if there are things I would need the regular drill for that I wouldn't use the impact drill for then I'll keep it thanks.
 

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Maybe you mean you now have a hammer drill? Or maybe you now have an impact driver? A drill can either be "regular" or hammer. A driver can be a impact driver.
 

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I assume that you mean an impact driver, and although similar in appearance and operation, they're two different tools, so I would hold on to the drill. An impact driver has a hex couple in place of a chuck, so you can't use standard drill bits that you may have. You can obviously buy drills with the hex on them, but more money per drill and fewer options if you get into something other than normal, say a brad point or Forstner bit. For various size holes in various materials, the drill will typically provide you with better speed control. And, if you ever have a significant number of screws to run, it's a whole lot more convenient to have a bit in the drill and one in the driver.
 

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Of the two Makita battery drills I have, one has hammer function. Its a little bit longer so it doesn't fit in the tightest spaces. Maybe a touch heavier. I never use the hammer function - its just a second drill.

I use a corded rotary-hammer with SDS bits for anything masonry/concrete.

I use the battery impact-driver when I'm driving a lot of screws, especially long ones; and mechanic work. The drill is nicer if I have to be quiet (inside, after-hours, etc.)
 

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You can buy drill bits that will fit in your impact driver....but if the going gets tough the rotational impact might snap them. I have 3/8” corded dewalt And 1/2” corded Milwaukee Hammer drills. Also a Makita LXT 18 Volt drill plus the lxt driver.....and wouldn’t part with any. As an example, this very afternoon I was in an attic with my cordless trying to blow a hole through 6” of top plate (don’t ask, I didn’t frame the house, it is pretty old) to drop wire to a new electrical outlet. Cordless drill Got in like four inches and started smoking. had to switch off to the half inch corded. if you still want to give something away, give it to a local Habitat chapter
 

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Impact drivers don't make good drills.

They do not have enough RPM for a lot of drilling applications, and the impacting can be very tough on hardened bits causing them to chip or break. You also must insert a hex chuck adapter or buy hex bits, both will provide additional "slack" at the bit and make the drill bit wobble considerably more. Any kind of precision drilling would be almost totally out of the question with an impact driver. If I had to choose only one tool it would definitely be the drill.

You can put a cordless drill in low gear and drive screws. That is all you could buy for many years, I've literally driven tens of thousands of screws with a cordless drill. Big, long screws or hard material can really tax a drill motor, where the impact can just run them right in. It's very good to own both, even better; I have several of each. When working with different sized bits or screws on the same job I don't need to constantly change out the drill or driver bits.
 

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If it is in fact a hammer drill, it should have a selector switch for regular rotational drilling, ir hammer drilling. If thats the case, yes it can be used just like a regular drill. Its probably a little bigger and heavier than a plain drill.
 

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I was working on the assumption that you were asking about using an "Impact driver" in place of a drill. A pic or even a model number would quickly clear up confusion on what tool you have and may change the advise offered. As mentioned a "hammer drill" is basically the same tool as your regular cordless drill, while impact driver is completely different.
 

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I was mixed up likely. For the record, a regular drill goes round and round, variable speeds but definitely high speed capable. A hammer drill does the same thing, but also gives a whack straight in periodically. Both have a chuck that will take a round drill bit, a hex driver bit, the end of one of the bits you pull out of those five in one screw drivers, or anything else you stick in there. An impact driver goes round just like a drill or hammer drill.....but instead of whacking the bit straight in when it hits pressure it whacks the bit around in a circle. All have their place And uses. For example, when you try to put In stainless trim head screws They are prone to breaking.
 
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