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Actually looks like two layers of Gypsum board, not Rock Lathe. From all appearances, looking at the other wall that is Lathe for a Lathe & Plaster wall, is that this place I would say has already been rehabbed before. Only real danger, would be that you are breathing dust with Lead Paint in it, if the Gypsum was installed when paint still had Lead in it. Floor tiles, outside shingles, pipe & duct wrappings would have had asbestos.
 

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no one can look at your pictures on the internet and tell you if there are microscopic fibers in the plaster.

you need to send it off to be tested (and quantified).
 

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You can verify asbestos with a hobby microscope and a picture for comparison.
 

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no. he still cant quantify and qualify it. some fibers are long, some are short, and the number of fibers matter.

it may indeed have asbestos in it and still not be dangerous.
He asked if the wall had asbestos. I told him how he could do that himself. I read the post as someone who wanted to deal with the problem based on whether asbestos was there or not.
Once asbestos is identified, do you treat the demo differently whether there's 10% or 40%?
 

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It takes an electron microscope to identify asbestos fibers. I doubt he has one sitting around.
It does not take an electron microscope to identify asbestos. The particle size of asbestos in plaster varies in size from small to fairly large.
I've been identifying asbestos in building products, with a 900 power microscope, for 20+ years.
 

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I would never ever recommend somebody try to do their own asbestos testing with a hobby microscope. And yes, it is possible for gysum wallboard to contain asbestos. I personally worked on a project to abate drywall from 160 apartment units. Some drywall had it. Some didn't. All of the joint compound had it. Units were built mid 1960s.
 

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I would never ever recommend somebody try to do their own asbestos testing with a hobby microscope.
Why not? What issue precludes taking a tiny amount of material and putting it on a slide?
 

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It does not take an electron microscope to identify asbestos. The particle size of asbestos in plaster varies in size from small to fairly large.
I've been identifying asbestos in building products, with a 900 power microscope, for 20+ years.
while it does not take and SEM, it does take at least a polarizing light microscope and the skill to use it.

a microscope that is 900x is probably garbage from china. My professional scopes generally have 10x 20x 40x primary with a 10x occular and we use oil occasionally to go to 1000x.

in any case, argue all you want, but you are unilaterally/absolutely wrong here. no one is going to change your mind, so believe what you want, but aesbestos identification (fiber type and family) and fiber count are the critical parts (not necessarily that the fibers exist, as lots of safe products have aesbestos).
 

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while it does not take and SEM, it does take at least a polarizing light microscope and the skill to use it.

a microscope that is 900x is probably garbage from china. My professional scopes generally have 10x 20x 40x primary with a 10x occular and we use oil occasionally to go to 1000x.

in any case, argue all you want, but you are unilaterally/absolutely wrong here. no one is going to change your mind, so believe what you want, but aesbestos identification (fiber type and family) and fiber count are the critical parts (not necessarily that the fibers exist, as lots of safe products have aesbestos).
The Poster was inquiring about the plaster he pictured. These binder pieces, in the plaster pictured can be indentified with a chinese hobby microscope. Maybe even a chinese magnifying glass.
Or a jewelers loop. Yeah, yeah, that's the ticket.:laughing:
 

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The Poster was inquiring about the plaster he pictured. These binder pieces, in the plaster pictured can be indentified with a chinese hobby microscope. Maybe even a chinese magnifying glass.
Or a jewelers loop. Yeah, yeah, that's the ticket.:laughing:
several people have debunked your claims with science, do you have any science or just pseudo-ad-hominem attacks?
 

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Asbestos fibers sitting on a table. Seen without anything but the naked eye. Old school plaster had fibers in it that were not processed like joint compound. Not as coarse as powdered insulation used to coat boilers back in the 30's and 40's, where apprentices poured the stuff out of bags, added water and applied it to the metal core to insulate it.
This thread is over.
Jack, have a nice "sciencey" day.
 

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Ok this isn't over yet. I learning more about my 110 year old house. Apparently over the years when remodeling was taken place asbestos abatement was done just in the small area. See first picture of boiler pipes.

image-1011182881.jpg

Then after opening additional walls found some pipes that were wrapped with some sort of old insulation that I can assume is more asbestos. See the next two pictures of other boiler pipes.

image-282985051.jpg

image-1432965914.jpg

I can see that the white stuff is asbestos but not quite sure how to remove. I plan on getting 6 mil thick bags plastic to confine the area, respirators, and soapy water to spray it. But that stuff looks tough.

Anyway to get this stuff off with out significant dust from having to possibly cut this stuff off? or can it be drenched and slide off?

Thanks.
 

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There are 2 separate issues with this insulation. The straight pipe is usually covered with an asbestos impregnated cardboard. These are held in place with a metal banded strapping. You unbend the strapping and remove it. The cover is open on one side and you open it at the split and it lifts off pretty easily.
The other part is the asbestos that encases the fittings. This needs to be removed by breaking it off the fittings in pieces. While both aspects need to be wetted to keep the dust down, the fittings need to be especially soaked.
Care needs to be taken in dealing with this. Others can deal with the precautions.
 

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That pipe wrap looks very much like asbestos. If it is that is the type that needs proper remediation. It is not DIY. It is one of the dangerous types with friable fibers that can fly around and contaminate your whole house.
 

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I think we are overlooking something in and amongst all the arguing... In many locales, if not most, it is illegal and punishable with hefty fines if you are found to have abated asbestos on your own, regardless if you did it correctly or not.
 

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I think we are overlooking something in and amongst all the arguing... In many locales, if not most, it is illegal and punishable with hefty fines if you are found to have abated asbestos on your own, regardless if you did it correctly or not.
I take issue with a few things in this post.
There was no arguing.
Homeowners can remove asbestos in there own homes in many places, even California, as long as they follow the states guidelines.
Here's a link to the California regulations.
http://www.vcapcd.org/asbestos.htm
 
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