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Discussion Starter #1
I have 2 of these trees in my back yard. They do very very well. The Blue Spruce that I have died so I would like to replace them with the tree in the photo. Can anyone identify the type of tree it is? There are 2 trees very close to each other. I am looking to identify the taller pine tree with the light colored tips. The one furthest in the pic. Thanks
 

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Master General ReEngineer
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Ayuh,... The last pic, the close up, appears to be a Cedar....

'course it's hard as 'ell to tell with the sideways pictures....
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Not sure why they came out sideways. I wish I knew what type of cedar so I could buy some more in spring. Maybe the nursery will know
 

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I agree with the Cedar...A closeup of the greens and your location would help.
 

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Ayuh,.... Red cedar is native to the West,...
It's a Popular ornamental in the east...

Native cedars in the Northeast are generally White cedar...
While talking to Keith (coco) up in BC I found out there is a red cedar up there but their red cedar is different from our red cedar.

The pictures above look like a type of cypress, not all cypress grow in the water. This doesn't look like the cedars we have here in Tennessee.
 

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Ayuh,.... Red cedar is native to the West,...
It's a Popular ornamental in the east...

Native cedars in the Northeast are generally White cedar...
Forestryimages.org provides several images of parts of Eastern redcedar. The tree is a conifer and the lineal taxonomy is Pinopsida > Pinales > Cupressaceae > Juniperus virginiana L. Eastern Redcedar is also commonly called southern juniper, southern red cedar and cedar.
The Range of Eastern Redcedar

USGS/Little
Eastern redcedar is the most widely distributed conifer of tree size in the Eastern United States and is found in every State east of the 100th meridian. The species extends northward into southern Ontario and the southern tip of Quebec. The range of eastern redcedar has been considerably extended, especially in the Great Plains, by natural regeneration from planted trees.


Yeah,there's quite a number of Cedars out there.
 

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My first thought was Cyprus----I am not a tree expert---Cyprus is a good looking ornamental.
 

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I knew someone with a couple of them----that's the only reason they looked familiar---
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I love Cypress trees. I have a bunch of Hinoki and Obtusa that I recently planted. I also have a few Leyland Cypress as well. They all seem to do very well here.

I had a line of Blue Spruce along the perimeter of my property but they all started dying from the ground up. This started happening long before I bought the house 7 months ago. I am in the process of ripping them out. The tree in the pic does very well and gives more privacy then the ornamental Cypress and adds more color then the Leyland.

I was convinced it was a type of pine tree and never considered it may be a Cypress or Cedar. Now looking at the trunk I think you guys are right. I googled Cedar's but have not found any that matched the look of this tree.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I took that pic early winter and not sure how well it shows in the pic but the ends of each branch get bright yellow during the summer. The rest of the tree stays green. This is what I love about the tree. Not sure if thats helps. I have tried googling every variation of pine/cypress/cedar and yellow tips etc. No luck so far.

Hopefully I can have better pics this weekend. Always too dark when I get home from work.

Thanks
 
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