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Discussion Starter #1
I recently installed 5 inch 3/8 inch thick engineered hardwood in my house. I tried to screw down subfloor to remove squeaks but some persisted. I suspect that at this point my best bet is to open the ceiling below and use squeak enders to pull the subfloor to the joists. What I've noticed though is that I have two kinds of noises. I've got the high pitch squeak that I heard before putting down the floor, as well as a lower pitched creak in some other areas. Could that be from boards that maybe were bowed, moving up and down and rubbing on the staples I used to install. If so, what's my best course of action to stop it? I don't think I can screw up through subfloor even if I opened the ceiling below, the floor seems too thin to catch a screw well even if I managed to put it to just the right depth (which seems tricky). Thoughts?
 

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So far we have no idea what the floor joist sizing or spacing is.
No idea what's there for a subfloor.
Thickness, T & G?
If the floor was still squeaking you should have stopped and add another layer of plywood to stiffen it up.
Going to play wack a mole trying to fix it from below now.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
2x12 16 O.C. Adding a layer wasn't an option for various reasons. On top of the joists are 2x8 planks and then what I believe is 1/2 inch t&g plywood
 

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Tileguy
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Your subfloor, you're saying is 2x8" planks? Are you sure? Sounds like something they'd do on the left coast, but since your joists are 16" oc that's not likely. This is one reason you're supposed to indicate your location and why we ask.......When posting in forums, letting us know your location will help others give better feedback/advice/solutions to your questions That info would tell us about your weather too. What's the humidity level in the house? Did you acclimate everything? I suppose you didn't also glue those 5" planks.

Furthermore, if the sub is 8" wide boards, your ½" underlayment is too thin. Doesn't mean that's why you've got squeaks though.

Squeakender is a good possibility. While you're under there look for nails that just hit the joists and split the wood.

Jaz
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm in Chicago. I could be wrong on what the subfloor sitting on the joists is, I'm just looking at it from the unfinished laundry room underneath. You're saying if that's actually what it is, then 1/2 inch plywood on top isn't enough. What is enough. I might be able to figure out how thick it is. Meanwhile, the question I have is still what could the second, lower pitched sound be? I have a funny feeling a few boards that weren't quite flat got padded my inspection, and even though they're nailed down, they're starting to bow up to return to their form, and whenever I step on them it pushes them back down to the plywood and they're rubbing against the staples. Does that make sense. If so, would face nailing the specific boards on an angle likely stop it for good? Or am I looking at ripping them out and replacing them?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
And the wood acclimated for a few weeks before installing. Humidity in the house is between 38% and 43%. M.C for plywood and hardwood were within 1.5% of each other
 

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Chasing squeaks can be a frustrating thing... And I speak largely from experience .

Usually they are caused as already. Mentioned by mechanical fasteners of some sort not firmly seated.

Was the original subfloor glued go the jousts.

Has had home undergone any drastic temperature changes. Hot go cold or vice versa.

Is there any mechanical work ie: plumbing, heating or electrical.

Do any joists contact each other either parallel or perpendicularly. Or is there a beam maybe a telepost.

Does the new ulay you put down contact the walls anywhere.

In an older house your subfloor may not be the even substrate. Using such a large plank flooring could possibly leave voids between the subfloor and new floor now leaving room for movement and subsequent squeaks.

Any freshly stapled floor acclimatized or not will creek and groan for a short time while settling down and with temperature change.

Is you go end up pulling problem, areas up I would recommend gliding the replacement pieces back in. I use Pl premium but normal yellow glue will work just make sure your staples hold of out some weight on it for an hour or so.

Anywho.... This is getting a little lengthy so hope this helps a little bit.


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Find the exact point of squeak and take 3" screw through the floor into joists until it stops. If that doesn't work and you can get under the floor I have had good luck with shims and glue taking up the slack. You'd be amazed at what just 1 correctly placed screw or shim can do to get rid of a squeak.
 

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Tileguy
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Seattle 2k,

This OP has hardwood floors installed. I have a feeling he may not want screws in them.

Jaz
 

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Discussion Starter #11
What I've determined is that it appears I have 1x8 planks directly on the joists, and then there's some sort of gap layer with some conduit running through the floor in some areas. I can't tell what's in that layer where there isn't conduit, it might be plywood across the entire floor, it might just be spacers scattered throughout (I sure how thsts not the case). On top of that is plywood, I believe tounge and Grove. I havent found my caliper yet to measure but I think it's either 5/8 or 3/4
 

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JazMan said:
Seattle 2k, This OP has hardwood floors installed. I have a feeling he may not want screws in them. Jaz
Oops,missed that part. Maybe still easier if no access from the bottom to countersink, screw and fill/hide than tearing out the ceiling below. But, I missed where that was stated.
 
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