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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm noticing the condensor unit is tippy and might need some anchoring down. We get occasional heavy winds and I'm not comfortable leaving it as is. I'm afraid it is going to rock back and forth, maybe even fall off a leg if the wind gets blowing hard enough. For sure it can't be good for it.

The pad is an E Lite Equipment pad and made of plastic, and hollow underneath. Not very solid for this application if you ask me.

A couple of ideas i'm kicking around is to support the unit with some wood, pull the pad out and slide a 24 x 24 concrete paver back under it with liquid nails applied to all surfaces. the other idea is to replace it with some pressure treated wood 6 x6 and 4x4.

I'm open to any suggestions how I can anchor this down better?

PS, Yes the lineset is already brazed in place, I realize I have to keep the heat pump unit at the same height.

Thanks in advance...
 

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May be tippy because the pad under it is not level and it sure looks like there was not enough fill around it to keep it from washing out.
 

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Go back and add your location to your profile.

It was installed to close to the house. Should have been out behind the drip ole of the roof.
 

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Those pads are alright for flat surfaces, but I always preferred to poor a concrete pad if there was any slope at all. Most hvac contractors won't go to the trouble, though, as you need to form and poor the concrete a few days before setting the unit down on it, and can't drill into it for 7 days (if my memory serves me). I don't think those pads will stand up to being drilled into for anchors. I think it would take a hell of a wind to blow the unit over, although those columns you have under it change its centre of gravity.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I doublechecked to see what is under it, stuck my fingers under that corner where there isn't much dirt. Its hollow and feels like plastic.

This pad appears to be some kind of plastic decorative cover that sets over a poured concrete pad.

Those pads are alright for flat surfaces, but I always preferred to poor a concrete pad if there was any slope at all. Most hvac contractors won't go to the trouble, though, as you need to form and poor the concrete a few days before setting the unit down on it, and can't drill into it for 7 days (if my memory serves me). I don't think those pads will stand up to being drilled into for anchors. I think it would take a hell of a wind to blow the unit over, although those columns you have under it change its centre of gravity.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It was moved out about 18" from the wall. The picture makes it look alot closer.

Go back and add your location to your profile.

It was installed to close to the house. Should have been out behind the drip ole of the roof.
 

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I'm Your Huckleberry
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You can't anchor to a plastic pad, not to mention anchoring is not going to solve the ground shifting. You need concrete or you need to level the ground under the unit, pack it down.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Supporting the unit and sliding a concrete paver in there while it is in operation is going to be the hardest part.

You can't anchor to a plastic pad, not to mention anchoring is not going to solve the ground shifting. You need concrete or you need to level the ground under the unit, pack it down.
 

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Jack the unit up remove the pad, go to a Stone/Masonry yard and pick up a precast pad and a couple bags of stone, put stone down and level, position new pad over stone and lower unit down on new pad, no need to anchor unit. Not a easy thing to do dealing with all that bulk weight.
Be careful of them refrigerant lines and wiring.
 

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Can you elaborate? Do I wrap it around the top of the unit securing it at two places to the wall? Would you drill new holes or existing screws that hold the unit together?
Your concern is to secure the unit from rocking/ moving in high winds.
Run the strap,maybe 2 straps around top and bottom of the unit and secure to the wall with some tapcon screws.
Ever need to service unit,remove screws and your good to go.
 

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Don't use that strapping it looks like crap, you wouldn't like the look and you will have to drill into your house. Have never seen anything like that in the field. If you really think you have to anchor it down you can go right through the inside of the unit down through the 4 legs into the concrete pad after the pad is changed and the unit is back level and in place. You really shouldn't have to anchor it.
 

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Don't use that strapping it looks like crap, you wouldn't like the look and you will have to drill into your house. Have never seen anything like that in the field. If you really think you have to anchor it down you can go right through the inside of the unit down through the 4 legs into the concrete pad after the pad is changed and the unit is back level and in place. You really shouldn't have to anchor it.
In other words,
Hire a HVAC guy to do it and not do it yourself.
Replacing the pad would require disconnecting the unit.
So spend 500 for the pad or 20 bucks on some strapping.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
A "HVAC guy" did this in the first place. I'm going to fix it.

In other words,
Hire a HVAC guy to do it and not do it yourself.
Replacing the pad would require disconnecting the unit.
So spend 500 for the pad or 20 bucks on some strapping.
 

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Concrete

Buy some 2 x 10's form around the whole thing, Pin the ouside with 2x2 stakes and level the box. Buy Sacrete, and mix in a wheelbarrow and pour a slab under it right up to the bottom of the condenser. This is going to sound funny, but if you have a vibrating massager, hold it against the sides of the form so it vibrates the concrete. This will remove air pockets against the form. use an edger around the slab to relieve the edge while the concrete is wet. If the concrete shrinks away from under the unit, just slide some Galvanized shims under the unit.

Whoever mounted your unit like that is............ well, "If you cant say anything nice, dont say anything at all"

Thumpers Mom
 

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I'm Your Huckleberry
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A "HVAC guy" did this in the first place. I'm going to fix it.
Not unless you have all the hvac tools to properly do it you're not. The true and proper way to do it is to remove/disconnect the unit and move it aside. Other than that you can pry up the unit and set bricks or dirt under there but without a build up and hard pack of the dirt you'll still be playing Russian Roulette.
 
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