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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
To cut back on costs Im wanting to go with a slab foundation for my new home. Im just worried it might look kind of weird considering its a colonial plan and the original architect drew the plans for a crawl space. Ive read about elevated slabs, but they add significantly to costs and tend to crack. I was wondering if its practical to poor the slab in such a way that its 12" in the front, and the standard 6" everywhere else. Does anybody ever do this when they poor a slab? It seems like it would be a common desire to get the cost benefits of a slab and still get the height and esthetics of a crawlspace.
 

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retired framer
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All that would need is a little more digging around the perimeter and 12" form, I would do that anyway to keep landscaping lower away from siding.
 

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Get quotes for both. A slab home isn't just a concrete pour, there will be rigid insulation below it and steel bars or wire through it. Then all utilities will need to make an extra trip to rough-in anything they need below it. And once installed don't change it. If a pipe below the concrete springs a leak it can be hard to find and expensive to fix.

The decision to use a slab foundation isn't just about cost, often times the ground below is not suitable for a basement or crawlspace. Your post doesn't say where you are located or anything about the soil and landscaping??

Bud
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The foundation is roughly 800 square feet. The length of the front is 32 feet. If the original quote was $4000, how much more do you think it would cost to make this happen? The lot already has a slight grade that would work in my favor, so probably not much extra digging.

Were you thinking something like this, where the slab abruptly changes depth, or the second one where its a slope to the front to achieve the 12"?
 

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retired framer
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The top sample is what we do when prepping for a garage and that gives you more of a footing. mostly we have to have a foundation deeper for the frost
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The lot is in upstate South Carolina, various options regarding where to put the home on the lot. Most of the lot is level, a portion of it has a slight grade. Maybe a 2 foot drop over 100 feet. The lot has great drainage. It has been cleared of trees for I suspect decades, so I would imagine the soil is reasonably compact. There is only one half bathroom downstairs and its located close to the edge of the floor plan, same goes for the kitchen, so i would imagine broken pipe repairs would be a little easier to fix...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Why would you use the first example for a garage? I don't think I drew it very well...I lack color vision but the color I think is green is suppose to be dirt/grass.

Also, how often do pipes rupture within a slab? We might get 20 frosts a year, and it hardly ever dips below 28 degrees in my neck of the woods..I understand that drains for toilets and sinks need to be incorporated though the concrete, but do they actually run pressurized pipes though the concrete? why not have the piping run from the main line and then surface just before the foundation, and then run them through the walls?
 

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retired framer
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I would do it that way because it would be easy to just dig out a little one the edge you are really going for depth on the outside edge.
We have frost here so we get water inside. And running thru attic would be special problem for insulation here too.
 
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