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Hi. Im new to this, asking for input and ideas and forums, but im drawing a blank on how to fix this issue/problem that i have. I bought my house a few years ago and it was built in 1934. The original hardwood floors are shot. Badly. I pulled all the carpet and old vinyl and linoleum and newspapers and such (mostly normal crap u would find). For the time being Im pitting down peel and stick downstairs bc its the most cost effective for the time being. Later down the road I will be putting ceramic tile but for now this is my only option for me. Honestly, i hate to cover wood work and I've worked hard on the other natural wood that was bad but I can't on this. Im on a fixed income and only have this option for the time (peel and stick).
My problem is this. In my dining room the floors are in 3rds and cut offs and do not run completely across as they should. I was able to fix the one half of the floor with little issue but not the main high traffic area. I dont want to put any more nails or screws into it bc thats also is part of the issue and caused some to crack. Im at a loss to be honest when i saw it. So i was thinking about cement or the underlament cement thing that self levels. I dont think a glue or primer will help. The boards themselfs in this area also lift up, twist and move a good bit when you walk on them. Not a good thing...
Any suggestions? Please help.
 

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I cannot make heads or tails out of exactly what your question is?

If you are going to cover that original flooring (as it needs) then just make sure it is secure. The best method is to glue and screw. If the wood is really poor in areas or uneven then consider replacing it with OSB.

Once your subfloor is solid you should install backer board on it. Once again, glue and screw. You can then use a leveler in getting the surface as level as possible prior to installing tile.

Good luck,
Ralph
 

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You are wasting your money when you place peel and stick tiles over a board floor. Over a short period of time the cracks will telescope through the tile. If you smooth it out with leveler, you might get a decent service life from a cushioned vinyl sheet product as they are more forgiving.

I just did some floors that looked a lot like your pictures. What I did was secure any / all loose boards, smooth out the worst of the imperfections using a leveler compound and then I nailed a new sub-floor of 3/8" bc plywood over that without regard to where the joists were located but taking care to get good uniform seams (only factory edge to factory edge) and staggered butt joints.

If money is really tight you could stop here until you accumulate some more then do whatever floor covering you want. I would not use Hardie board for this step because I would be concerned about living with the exposed silica dust. The naked plywood would look better than what you have.

The newly created flat surface is suitable for carpet, glue down 12 x 12 vinyl tile, peel and stick tiles, linoleum, laminate flooring or one of the prefinished wood / Bamboo products.

Most all of us were financially challenged at one time and we do what we have to do.
 

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Money looks to be your biggest hold up....

I would make sure it's all secure and level. Sand and finish (stain/sealer) the floor so it looks better and use some area rugs while you save up for your finished floor choice.

Skip the peal and stick tiles unless they are laid down perfectly, costing you time and money, they will move leaving gaps.
 

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You are wasting your money when you place peel and stick tiles over a board floor. Over a short period of time the cracks will telescope through the tile......I would not use Hardie board for this step because I would be concerned about living with the exposed silica dust. The naked plywood would look better than what you have.

I agree with your first sentence but the entire purpose of using backer board is to create a good surface for his peel and stick and then later ceramic tile, which he states he is going to be using. He's not going to have exposed backer board.

If the OP is really strapped for cash I would just shore up the subfloor and then install some affordable carpet over it. He could do that quickly and it's easily removed later.

Ralph
 

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OK, so if I'm understanding your situation, you like boards and you have experience in making wood boards look nice. But these are too far gone. If I'm summarizing your concerns accurately and you certainly need to strengthen and make the floor continuous, what about lifting the individual boards and then putting down 3/4" (23/32") plywood. Then consider reinstalling the salvaged boards along with others that are the same thickness or adjusting accordingly to create a patterned reinstall. Those boards could be cleaned up and used in the floor or elsewhere and they are likely better than anything you could buy today.

Leaving the boards in place and putting anything on top of them may lead to more problems as they are individual boards with potential elevation changes between the sides and the ends. If you really want a flat floor, put down the thickest, strongest substrate you can afford before installing tile. I would lean toward the plywood I mention, probably adding either hardibackerboard or other concrete-type board on top if you are ever going to install tile.

Just a suggestion, maybe only worth what you are paying for it.

Best of luck to you :)
 
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