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I am mapping all my electrical circuits in an old house I purchased. Wiring was upgraded many years ago and then renovations were done as well 20 years ago.

My question is, can you have to non-adjacent breakers feeding a into a single junction box or 2-gang switch box? I found two such instances and I am concerned.

First case. 2-Gang switch box with two switches. Each switch is on a separate breaker and the breakers are not adjacent. All wires are 14/2.
One switches operate a 2 way stair light, the second operates an outdoor light and duplex receptacle.

Second case. a junction box in the basement ceiling is fed by two non-adjacent breakers. After the junction box, one pair wires goes to a switched oh light and outdoor GFI outlet. The other feeds living room receptacles(4) and a GFI outdoor Receptacle. All wires are14/2

Code talks about using 3 wire for multiple duplex receptacles . Ie these are split receptacles, the breakers must be tied. If not then they still must be adjacent in the panel.
 

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I am mapping all my electrical circuits in an old house I purchased. Wiring was upgraded many years ago and then renovations were done as well 20 years ago.

My question is, can you have to non-adjacent breakers feeding a into a single junction box or 2-gang switch box? I found two such instances and I am concerned.

First case. 2-Gang switch box with two switches. Each switch is on a separate breaker and the breakers are not adjacent. All wires are 14/2.
One switches operate a 2 way stair light, the second operates an outdoor light and duplex receptacle.

Second case. a junction box in the basement ceiling is fed by two non-adjacent breakers. After the junction box, one pair wires goes to a switched oh light and outdoor GFI outlet. The other feeds living room receptacles(4) and a GFI outdoor Receptacle. All wires are14/2

Code talks about using 3 wire for multiple duplex receptacles . Ie these are split receptacles, the breakers must be tied. If not then they still must be adjacent in the panel.
Two separate 120v circuits can be in a box. Breakers need not be adjacent.

MWBC must have a handle tie or use a two pole breaker 2008 code.

MWBC circuits on a single device require a handle tie or two pole breaker. 2005 code and earlier.
 

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Made this its own thread.
 

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This happens with multiple gang switch boxes. Things just need to be on separate circuits sometimes!

I put a warning note in the breaker panel to turn off the main breaker before servicing such multiple gang switch boxes. I say there are multiple circuits feeding it.

No harm in writing a warning on the junction boxes as well.
 

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I am mapping all my electrical circuits in an old house I purchased. Wiring was upgraded many years ago and then renovations were done as well 20 years ago.

My question is, can you have to non-adjacent breakers feeding a into a single junction box or 2-gang switch box? I found two such instances and I am concerned.

First case. 2-Gang switch box with two switches. Each switch is on a separate breaker and the breakers are not adjacent. All wires are 14/2.
One switches operate a 2 way stair light, the second operates an outdoor light and duplex receptacle.

Second case. a junction box in the basement ceiling is fed by two non-adjacent breakers. After the junction box, one pair wires goes to a switched oh light and outdoor GFI outlet. The other feeds living room receptacles(4) and a GFI outdoor Receptacle. All wires are14/2

Code talks about using 3 wire for multiple duplex receptacles . Ie these are split receptacles, the breakers must be tied. If not then they still must be adjacent in the panel.
the code reference you are talking about is a totally different scenario than what you have in your home. What you have is in fact perfectly legal. The scenario where the breakers need to be tied together is where two seperate circuits are fed off of one cable (the cable having two separate hots). The two different circuits share the same neutral. Therefor if you shut power off to one circuit, the neutral to that circuit may still have power on the neutral. That is why the handles must be tied together. Totally different than what you have
 
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