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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Everyone,

I am planning to take out this wall in a couple of weeks.
Property Furniture Wood Shelf Shelving
Brown Property White Black Wood


The tile floor is staying (for now) and so is the hardwood. The difference in height between them is about 1". How would you handle this transition?

My current plan is to buy a 5/4 x 4 1/2" piece of red oak and make a custom transition. This is going to be labor intensive though, and I don't have a planer, so I'd have to make do with a table saw.

Do you have suggestions for doing this in a less labor intensive way? It's between the dining room and kitchen, and I want to minimize the chance for tripping as much as possible.

Thanks in advance.
 

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Lumber Liquidators sells transition strips or reducers. This one is 3/4" high ... depending on your actual height difference this might work. You could have a little bit of the tile showing, or you could shim this up to be flush.

At $8/lf this one is horribly expensive, you might be able to find something cheaper.

Rectangle Font Wood Wood stain Plank
 

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Naildriver
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If you are removing the wall, you will have more wood flooring and tile to deal with. The gap under the wall will need to be dealt with.
 
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Hopefully everything has been verified from a structural standpoint.

And, yes, you'll need more than a transition, but something to fill in the flooring when the wall goes. Perhaps you have hardwood floors in your kitchen under the sticky tile, and you may just be able to fill in more hardwood, refinish the kitchen floor for a seamless transition. Or is it tile?? If so you'll have to fill in the gap, and then custom mill along transition akin the short 36 inch long ones sold commercially.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Appreciate the advice everyone. The height difference is 15/16". Plan was to fill in the space where the bottom plate is coming out with 3/4" ply under the transition and cover or just fill in the hardwood up to the wall the rest of the way.

Wall is approved to be removed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Lumber Liquidators sells transition strips or reducers. This one is 3/4" high ... depending on your actual height difference this might work. You could have a little bit of the tile showing, or you could shim this up to be flush.

At $8/lf this one is horribly expensive, you might be able to find something cheaper.

View attachment 701004
Thanks for the advice. When you say shim it up, do you mean just the angle would be steeper? It'd have to go up almost 1/4". Think that'll work?
 

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"My current plan is to buy a 5/4 x 4 1/2" piece of red oak and make a custom transition. This is going to be labor intensive though, and I don't have a planer, so I'd have to make do with a table saw."

I like this idea and have used it myself with the shape shown in #2 by Eddie.
I have taken the wood to a 'cabinet maker' and paid them for the labor. It has worked very nicely for 15 years.
 

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Remodel and New Build GC
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"My current plan is to buy a 5/4 x 4 1/2" piece of red oak and make a custom transition. This is going to be labor intensive though, and I don't have a planer, so I'd have to make do with a table saw."

I like this idea and have used it myself with the shape shown in #2 by Eddie.
I have taken the wood to a 'cabinet maker' and paid them for the labor. It has worked very nicely for 15 years.
ELMER.....I think you have the right idea.!!!!!!!!!!

I gave up searching for "matching and correct" transitions very very long ago. Easier/faster/cheaper to just make it.

Rather than buying 5/4 wood....I'd glue up two nice S4S 3/4 boards for your height.....you won't need a planer...a good table saw blade and a belt sander will surface that fine for a transition.

(Also, I used to use Floor Decor to find a matching finish/wood for many applications. Not sure they still do, but you used to be able to take samples home for $5 a piece....sure was convenient and easy.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
ELMER.....I think you have the right idea.!!!!!!!!!!

I gave up searching for "matching and correct" transitions very very long ago. Easier/faster/cheaper to just make it.

Rather than buying 5/4 wood....I'd glue up two nice S4S 3/4 boards for your height.....you won't need a planer...a good table saw blade and a belt sander will surface that fine for a transition.

(Also, I used to use Floor Decor to find a matching finish/wood for many applications. Not sure they still do, but you used to be able to take samples home for $5 a piece....sure was convenient and easy.)
Gotcha. Good recommendation. I think I will just go ahead and custom make it. Doesn't look like I'll find what I'm looking for stock for this situation.
 

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Custom-made is the best solution. Anything else is going to require customization to "make it work", so, you might as well just bite the whole bullet.
 
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Hey Everyone,

I am planning to take out this wall in a couple of weeks. View attachment 700999 View attachment 701000

The tile floor is staying (for now) and so is the hardwood. The difference in height between them is about 1". How would you handle this transition?

My current plan is to buy a 5/4 x 4 1/2" piece of red oak and make a custom transition. This is going to be labor intensive though, and I don't have a planer, so I'd have to make do with a table saw.

Do you have suggestions for doing this in a less labor intensive way? It's between the dining room and kitchen, and I want to minimize the chance for tripping as much as possible.

Thanks in advance.
Hello I'm Charles the carpenter since most door jambs in residential houses are four and a half inches wide 5 in wide should be wide enough to make this threshold...............

Build a box out of scrap material plywood or one by six s .........3 in by 48 in by 5 in tall this is a jig to make a crucial cut on your threshold.......... so you won't need a table saw or a planer to do this just

a skill saw with carbide tips this box has no bottom or top..... screw the box down to the table take ....a test piece of threshold made out of scraps 5 in by 1 ft.......3 quarter-inch stick screw it to the side of your box right in the middle set your saw on 15° and one an a quarter inch deep

now set your skill saw plate on top of the box and make the cut 3/16 in from the top of your threshold test piece........ Eye ball your blade to see how 15 degrees works ..........the blade should be pointing from 3/16 at one end of the one by test piece to the three quarter of a inch end of the test piece threshold. ..... adjust the blade degree until at least it looks eyeball aligned

but you only making a cut an inch and a quarter deep riding on those two jig rails.... now unscrew your test from the side of the box lay it flat down on the table. , top side of threshold down against the table tack it down to the table with the screws at the very end and in the thicker part of the threshold. ...

Make this cut an inch in a eighth from the edge of the board ....Don't overrun the cut you made from up on the jig ..and the depth you have to measure to get it exact so you won't put a crack in that thin , 3/ 16 edge , then pop it out with a chisel gently now make sure you have goggles on for this next part

set your skill saw blade 1/8 in deep , that's 1/8 of the blade cutting the wood pull the safety guard back and hold it with your hands do not put a wedge in it or tie it , and stroke the saw towards you sideways , using it as a plane then move forward about three quarters of an inch and stroke it again and repeat that until you get to the thick part of the threshold that's still three quarters you can stop when you're about an inch and a quarter from the edge of the board

it will take about six passes before you get it down to the beveled angle three quarters to 3/16 shim and screw this threshold down and get it perfect. .. then take it back up ... put a bed of tile mortar underneath ..so it won't be any hollow spots and ,

reinstall it , no stepping on it for 24 hours

this takes about 2 hours you will have to shim the three quarters in side up one quarter to meet the wood flooring and you can shim the tile up 1/8 and fill it with silicone to match the 3/16 side of your threshold to achieve perfection
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hello I'm Charles the carpenter since most door jambs in residential houses are four and a half inches wide 5 in wide should be wide enough to make this threshold...............

Build a box out of scrap material plywood or one by six s .........3 in by 48 in by 5 in tall this is a jig to make a crucial cut on your threshold.......... so you won't need a table saw or a planer to do this just

a skill saw with carbide tips this box has no bottom or top..... screw the box down to the table take ....a test piece of threshold made out of scraps 5 in by 1 ft.......3 quarter-inch stick screw it to the side of your box right in the middle set your saw on 15° and one an a quarter inch deep

now set your skill saw plate on top of the box and make the cut 3/16 in from the top of your threshold test piece........ Eye ball your blade to see how 15 degrees works ..........the blade should be pointing from 3/16 at one end of the one by test piece to the three quarter of a inch end of the test piece threshold. ..... adjust the blade degree until at least it looks eyeball aligned

but you only making a cut an inch and a quarter deep riding on those two jig rails.... now unscrew your test from the side of the box lay it flat down on the table. , top side of threshold down against the table tack it down to the table with the screws at the very end and in the thicker part of the threshold. ...

Make this cut an inch in a eighth from the edge of the board ....Don't overrun the cut you made from up on the jig ..and the depth you have to measure to get it exact so you won't put a crack in that thin , 3/ 16 edge , then pop it out with a chisel gently now make sure you have goggles on for this next part

set your skill saw blade 1/8 in deep , that's 1/8 of the blade cutting the wood pull the safety guard back and hold it with your hands do not put a wedge in it or tie it , and stroke the saw towards you sideways , using it as a plane then move forward about three quarters of an inch and stroke it again and repeat that until you get to the thick part of the threshold that's still three quarters you can stop when you're about an inch and a quarter from the edge of the board

it will take about six passes before you get it down to the beveled angle three quarters to 3/16 shim and screw this threshold down and get it perfect. .. then take it back up ... put a bed of tile mortar underneath ..so it won't be any hollow spots and ,

reinstall it , no stepping on it for 24 hours

this takes about 2 hours you will have to shim the three quarters in side up one quarter to meet the wood flooring and you can shim the tile up 1/8 and fill it with silicone to match the 3/16 side of your threshold to achieve perfection
Thanks for the detailed help!
 
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